20 steps to spirituality

1 Do charity regularly, every month, or even daily according to your means, say atleast six paisa per rupee earned
2 Do not depend upon servants. do not engage others for menial service but Provide them gainful employment .Self-reliance is the highest of all virtues
3 Fast on Ekadasi, or once a fortnight live Only on liquid food or just fruits
4 Get by heart some prayer-Slokas, Stotras and repeat them as soon as you sit in the Asana before starting Japa or meditation.
5 Have Japa Mala (rosary), and keep repeating hotly names, NAMA Sangirtan,
6 Have Satsanga.Avoid any evil /helpless habits.Give up bad / unproductive company,
7 Never hurt anybody (Ahimsa Paramo Dharmah). Control anger by love, Kshama (forgiveness) and Daya (compassion).
8 Observe Mouna Vrata (vow of silence) for a couple of hours daily.
9 Practaice Fourfold sadhana: discrimination, dispassion, sixfold virtues and desire for Liberation.
10 Preserve Veerya , It is God in motion or manifestation—Vibhuti. It is the essence of life, thought and intelligence
11 Reduce your wants. Meet only your basic needs.Avoid unnecessary worry. Have simple living and high thinking.Be content. Be not Greedy or selfish.
12 Remember that death is awaiting you at every moment. Never fail to fulfil your duties. Have pure conduct (Sadachara).Do not run after Desires
13 Repeat any Mantra as pure Om or Om Namo Narayanaya, Om Namah Sivaya, according to your taste or inclination, say from 108 to 21,600 times daily.
14 Sit on Padma, Siddha or Sukha Asana for Japa and meditation for half an hour, facing the east or the north. Do Sirshasana and Sarvangasana Pranayamas.etc., regularly.
15 Speak the truth at all cost. Speak a little. Speak sweetly.
16 Study systematically the Gita,Upanishads or Bible, Zend Avesta, the Koran, one hour daily and have Suddha Vichara.
17 Take Sattvic food, Suddha Ahara Give up those things which the mind likes best for a fortnight in a year. Give up salt and sugar for a month.
18 Think of CREATOR and Thank as soon as you wake up and just before you go to sleep. Surrender yourself completely to God (Saranagati).
19 Think of the mistakes you have committed during the course of the day, just before retiring to bed (self-analysis, and work on corrective action Dont brood
20 Wake up and Get up at Brahmamuhurta which is extremely favourable for meditation every day

What Would Buddha Do at Work, Extracts

First recognize that you are responsible for your own future.
Second, recognize that you always have a choice.

Mission statements for your organization and life are key to enlightened work. The mission statement is a compass to guide your priorities and decisions so you do not become lost in day-to-day activities.
Part of the Eightfold Noble Path is choosing Right Livelihood. Do work that helps rather than harms living things.
It is not wise to become too attached to one job or career. Things change, everything is transitory. Find your freedom in that truth.
Do great work, all the time.
Start work before the boss gets in, and leave after she does.
Do not take more than you should. Taking home a pencil or minor office supply is stealing.
You represent your employer, so uphold the company name.
Your self-confidence increases when you know you have done good work. Good results come from healthy self-esteem.
Action always beats inaction. Making mistakes is better than not doing anything at all. If you aren’t making mistakes, it means you are not taking risks and not trying hard enough.
You are a work in progress. You are responsible for your own self-improvement.
Practice yoga or meditation to learn how to focus.
If you have ten things to do and only enough time to finish six things, choose the right six and go home without worrying about the four you had to let go.
There is nothing you can do about the past and you cannot predict the future. The only time that matters is now.
Speak your mind and share your ideas. Do not keep them to yourself.
Under-promise and over-deliver. Keep all commitments.
Talk is cheap. People like to see action, results, and follow-through.
Your internal moral compass will warn you when you are violating your own integrity.
Respect company property like it is your own.
Go about your work quietly and deliberately. There is no need to make public all your efforts. Results will speak for themselves.
There is no single right way to solve a problem. The problem itself is always changing.
Be flexible and learn to live with uncertainty.
Admit you made a mistake. It means you are teachable and humble.
Do your best work. Promotions and perks are only side effects of doing brilliant work.
If you wear self-confidence, it doesn’t matter what you are wearing.
Celebrate the successes of others.
Physical and worldly things like money are necessary for survival but they will not make you happy. The best things in life aren’t things.
There is nothing wrong with personal wealth as long as it is put to good use. Good stewardship of money comes from a sense of integrity. Wealth must be used for your family, employees, and friends. Give to spiritual organizations.
Real happiness comes when we are free from cravings and endless desires.
Treat money like a visitor we respect but we know can be dangerous.
When depressed, the best way to feel better is to do something for others.
Only inferior people need a code of ethics. If you know in your heart what is right and wrong you do not need to be told how to behave.
You don’t need a lot to get by. Work with what you’ve got.
Learn from every opportunity, even if it means taking on a task you don’t want to do. It may be that nobody else can do the job except you at the moment.
Hypocrisy happens when you fool yourself.
Gossip is a waste of time.
Surround yourself with people you admire and respect. When you work with someone better than you, your performance will improve.
You can change.
Make every day productive.
It is healthy to balance work and personal life. This is the Middle Way.
Think for yourself. Push yourself to achieve higher goals.
It’s easier to just follow the pack and be mediocre. Living a life of integrity is hard work.
Wealth and power won’t make you happy. Health, love, and peace of mind will.

Buddha’s tips on effective handling of customers:

Be compassionate. Do not meet his anger with yours.
Be grateful. Thank the customer for bringing the problem to your attention.
Listen. Take notes so the customer will not have to repeat his story to your boss.
Emphasize what you can do for the customer, not what you can’t do.
Get help from a coworker or from your boss.
Explain and educate the customer as you interact.
Commit to what you can do to fix the problem. Always deliver more than you promised.
Thank the customer again for the opportunity he gave you to serve him.
Follow up. Keep to your commitment and do what you said you would do.

Buddha’s Basics on being a good boss or employer:

Assign work employees can manage. Make sure job requirements match the employees’ skills and talents. Keep them challenged by assigning special projects, cross training, or job rotation.
Give employees free food and enough money. Productivity and health are related. Pay them well and care for them, and they will pay you back with good work and loyalty.
Support them in sickness. Provide healthcare for all your employees.
Share the bounty. Profit-sharing and other equitable means of sharing the wealth will let your people know you appreciate their efforts.
Grant leave when appropriate. People are not machines and should not be treated as such. Maternity and paternity leaves, sabbaticals to “recharge the batteries” and special days off for families are very important to increasing productivity. Recharged workers make up for lost time after a refreshing holiday with new ideas, more energy and less stress.

Buddha’s notes on capital:

Never abandon what can still be useful. Repair it. Invest in quality well-made furniture, floors and fixtures.
Select and hire carefully. People must be cultivated for long-term, and not dumped at the first sign of tough times.
Be moderate in consuming resources. Recycle paper. Fly coach instead of first class. Share office spaces and dining spaces.
Real success depends on the virtue and character of leaders. No amount of charm will make up for the lack of confidence people have in you.

Hiring according to Buddha:

Begin inside. Clarify what kind of person you are looking for. Define the character, competence, and culture of your people.
Be methodical. Do your homework by looking at track records and cast the net as wide as possible. Do no limit the search to obvious candidates.
Be clear about tasks and duties the candidate needs to do.
Consider what it takes to be successful in your organization or department. List traits.
Involve other people in the interview process.
Ask behavioral questions. What happened to them in a particular situation in the past and how did they handle it?
Use tests to bring out skills and abilities.
Ask about her other skills.
Be honest about the job, the pay, the hours, and the duties.
A person may pass the interview with flying colors, but may be terrible at the actual job.
Training according to Buddha:

Trainers must not make false promises by oversimplifying the complexity of the business.
Recognize that every person learns differently and at a different pace.
Create an environment where people are challenged, work together to solve problems, and collaborate to achieve the targets.

Conflict resolution:

When someone is provoking divisiveness, try to get that person back in harmony with the larger group.
Go to the person privately and counsel him. Do not humiliate him in front of coworkers.
If that fails after three times, call the group together in a group intervention so the troublemaker can see how his actions affect everyone.
Splintering into factions will hinder productivity. Do not abandon a person, the leader and team must make every effort to help the person mend his ways.
In a crisis, take action immediately. No amount of spin doctoring and damage control can substitute for concrete action.
Turning a floundering

Author : Franz Metcalf & BJ Gallagher Hateley
Publisher : McGraw-Hill 2002

The Eleventh Commandment Sandra Vanderwerwe , Value to Customer

The Eleventh Commandment Sandra Vanderwerwe Wiley 1996 244 pages ISBN 0-471-95823-9

We were not adding value, all these days by we were adding costs. Value only happens in the customer’s space. what customers do to get the results they want, and how corporates respond ADDs value.
Rather than just be more proficient at making and moving more products or services to meet year- end budgets, people (must) learn how to develop and build relationships, which commit customers to do business with them over a lifetime

Bill Gates, quoted from ‘The road ahead, 1995’ on the dangers of complacency: “Death can come swiftly to a market leader, by the time you have lost the positive-feedback cycle it’s often too late to change what you’ve been doing, and all the elements of the negative spiral come into play. It is often difficult to recognise that you are in a crisis and react to it when your business appears perfectly healthy”.
Success can (and does) breed failure. The better the blinder so to speak. Success obscures from our vision the first signs of failure. It can make us complacent and insensitive to danger Better a corporation becomes at doing something the more difficult it is, to do something else
When still being run by an analytic bias, management takes a narrow view of reality. Historic (hard) facts overrule intuitive or creative feelings about market position Only when thinking starts with end-users, and works back into the organisation, can we hope to ‘own’ customers, not just win them over
Good Mission leads to Decisions on resource allocation. Redeployment of people. New product and service innovations. New capability building. With whom to partner. Where and how to generate profit

01. Has integrity – a true sense of purpose – something the corporation intends to do and deliver better than anyone else.
02. Has a distinguishing notion (a good mission can be stated as a story or a slogan), something which makes it unique and gives it a distinctive position in the chosen market/s.
03. Should be meaningful and relevant – and make a tangible difference to personal and/or work lives.
04. Is enduring and extendable, is able to sustain relationships.
05. Communicates easily and memorably – encapsulating both a purpose for the firm and a promise to customers.
06. Is simple (as opposed to simplistic).
07. Is grounded in values with which employees can associate.
08. Is easily translated into specific behaviours – from a good mission, employees should know what to do differently, or what different activities to do.
09. Is distinctive – it is memorable and ‘new/novel’, not only gets people pointed in the same direction, but energised.
10. Is credible but not confining – capturing competencies the corporation either has the potential to quickly acquire.
11. Pulls together resources from various parts of the company”.

Despite everything that’s said about what can be done to drive a corporation to the market place, managing resistance and resistors is a crucial part.
One, resistance is not linked to seniority. Some of the most resistance you will find in the highest places.
Two, linked to this: often the most powerful people are those whose knowledge, feel and experience are most out of touch with new customer logic.
And, following this, three, the people who motivate and drive the corporation forward, and turn ideas, concepts and frameworks into a new corporate way, are to be found everywhere within the organisation”.

Increasingly, customers will be looking for single source (or fewer) suppliers as partners, so as to free themselves to spend time, energy and resources on their own extended core activities Customers couldn’t care less how we are structured, who owns or reports to whom, so long as they get the results they want – delivered when, where and how they want them Instead of telling people what they must do, the new corporation must now tell people what it expects. Instead of telling them how to do things, it must create the context and environment and provide the enablers to help them get on and do what needs to be done

Proposition 1: If things are always routine, we are not learning. Proposition 2: If things are always spontaneous, we are not learning”.

No longer can they simply respond to customer requests and that way improve performance. They must anticipate the possibilities, for and with customers New corporations ask a different set of questions:
1. What will it cost if we don’t do it?
2. What return can we get from customers over their lifetime, if we do it better than anyone else?
3. What will this take?
4. What will this cost?
5. What will we lose if we don’t do it?
6. And what will that cost?”

Wiley 1996 244 pages ISBN 0-471-95823-9