One Minute Teacher By Spencer Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Minute Teacher: How to Teach Others to Teach Themselves By Spencer Johnson, M.D. and Constance Johnson, M.Ed.

One Minute Goal Setting:

 

 

 

 

Using the steps below, encourage your clients to set goals for themselves and take one minute a few times a day to look at their goals. 1. I take the time to quietly think, with my head and my heart about what I want to teach myself. And then I decide what my goals are. 2. I write my goals in first person, present tense, as though 

 

I am already  achieving my goals. (For example: “I am enjoying getting a B in math.”) 3. I write down my goals briefly, so I can read them often in only one minute. 4. I am specific when writing my goal. I set a date to achieve my goal. (For example: “I am enjoying a B on this Thursday’s English exam.”) 5. I use good-feeling words. (For example: I enjoy….) Each time I read my goal, I imagine how good I feel

. 6. I take one minute, several times a day, to stop and look at my goals and to look at my behavior—and then I see if my behavior matches my goals.

One Minute Praisings

Encourage your clients to reflect on or catch themselves doing something right by following these steps: 1. I praise myself  

immediately. 2. As soon as I have done something right, I tell myself  specifically  what I did right, or approximately right. 3. I tell myself how good I  feel   about what I did right. I pause for a few seconds to really feel my success. 4. I remind myself that I am indeed a good person. 5. I encourage myself to continue the same good behavior because I want to feel good again soon— about my behavior and about myself.

One Minute Recovery:

When a client’s behavior does not align with his/her own goals, encourage the client to practice the One Minute Recovery:

 

The first half of the minute: 1. As soon as possible I see when my behavior does not match my goal. 2. I tell myself specifically what I did wrong—what is keeping me from teaching myself what I want to learn. 3. I am silent for a few seconds to quietly feel my “fumble.” The more uncomfortable I feel, the more I want to recover.

The second half of the minute: 1. I remind myself that my behavior is not good right now, but that I am good. I redirect my behavior and feel good about myself. I do not defend my behavior, even to myself. 2. I teach myself what I want to learn. I change my behavior and recover.

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