Thoughts By Brian Tracy Success Leaves Tracks

I began searching for the secrets of success many years ago,and learnt from  A wise man who had studied success for more than 50 years who concluded that the greatest success principle of all was, “learn from the experts.”
Learn From the Experts .If you want to be a big success in any area, find out what other successful people in that area are doing, and do the same things, until you get the same results. When I studied the interviews, speeches, biographies and autobiographies of successful men and women, I found that they all had one quality in common. They were all described as being “extremely well organized.” They used their time very, very well. They were highly productive and they got vastly more done in the same period of time than the average person.
Be Both Effective and Efficient. High performing men and women were both effective and efficient. They did the right things, and they did them in the right way. They were constantly looking for ways to improve the quality and quantity of their output. As a result, their contribution to their organizations was vastly higher and therefore much better paid, than the contributions of the average person.
Action Exercises . Here are two things you can do immediately to put these ideas into action: First, develop a study plan today to learn from the experts in your field. This can save you years of hard work. Second, decide what is the most important thing to do, and then decide how to do it.

Plan and Prepare;Thoughts By Brian Tracy

Use A Time Planner A time planner, broken down by day, hour and minute, organized in advance, can be one of the most powerful, personal productivity tools of all. It enables you to see where you can consolidate and create blocks of time for concentrated work. Eliminate All Distractions During this working time, you turn off the telephone, eliminate all distractions and work non-stop. One of the best work habits of all is for you to get up early and work at home in the morning for several hours. You can get three times as much work done at home without interruptions as you ever could in a busy office where you are surrounded by people and bombarded by phone calls. Create an Office in the Air When you fly on business, you can create your office in the air by planning your work thoroughly before you depart. When the plane takes off, you can work non-stop for the entire flight. You will be amazed at how much work you can go through when you work steadily in an airplane, without interruptions. Make Every Minute Count One of the keys to high levels of performance and productivity is for you to make every minute count. Use travel and transition time, what is often called “gifts of time” to complete small chunks of larger tasks. Remember, the pyramids were built one block at a time. A great life and a great career is built one task, and often, one part of a task, at a time. Your job in time management is to deliberately and creatively organize the concentrated time periods you need to get your key jobs done well, and on schedule. Action Exercises Here are two steps you can take immediately to put these ideas into action. First, think continually of different ways that you can save, schedule and consolidate large chunks of time. Use this time to work on important tasks with the most significant long-term consequences. Second, make every minute count. Work steadily and continuously without diversion or distraction by planning and preparing your work in advance. Most of all, keep focused on the most important results for which you are responsible.

Thoughts By Brian Tracy;The Power of Pausing

  •All the succcessful persons ask good questions and listen carefully to the answers. One of the most important skills of listening is simply to pause before replying. When the prospect finishes talking, rather than jumping in with the first thing that you can think of, take three to five seconds to pause quietly and wait. •Becoming a Master of the Pause  >All excellent listeners are masters of the pause. They are comfortable with silences. When the other person finishes speaking, they take a breath, relax and smile before saying anything. They know that the pause is a key part of good communications. •Three Benefits of Pausing >Pausing before you speak has three specific benefits. The first is that you avoid the risk of interrupting the prospect if he or she has just stopped to gather his or her thoughts. Remember, your primary job in the sales conversation is to build and maintain a high level of trust, and listening builds trust. When you pause for a few seconds, you often find the prospect will continue speaking. He will give you more information and further opportunity to listen, enabling you to gather more of the information you need to make the sale. •Carefully Consider What You Just Heard >The second benefit of pausing is that your silence tells the prospect that you are giving careful consideration to what he or she has just said. By carefully considering the other person’s words, you are paying him or her a compliment. You are implicitly saying that you consider what he or she has said to be important and worthy of quiet reflection. You make the prospect feel more valuable with your silence. You raise his self-esteem and make him feel better about himself. •Understanding With Greater Efficiency >The third benefit of pausing before replying is that you will actually hear and understand the prospect better if you give his or her words a few seconds to soak into your mind. The more time you take to reflect upon what has just been said, the more conscious you will be of the their real meaning. You will be more alert to how his words can connect with other things you know about the prospect in relation to your product or service. •The Message You Send >When you pause, not only do you become a more thoughtful person, but you convey this to the customer. By extension, you become a more valuable person to do business with. And you achieve this by simply pausing for a few seconds before you reply after your prospect or customer has spoken. •Action Exercises >Here are two things you can do immediately to put these ideas into action.First, take time to carefully consider what the customer just said and what he might mean by it. Pausing allows you to read between the lines.Second, show the customer that you really value what he has said by reflecting for a few moments before you reply.

Thoughts By Brian Tracy-Break Away From Old Ideas

  •Highly creative people tend to have fluid, flexible, adaptive minds. Here are three statements that creative people can make easily and which you learn by regular practice •Admit It When You Are Wrong >The first is simply, “I was wrong.” Many people are so concerned with being right that all their mental energy is consumed by stonewalling, bluffing, blaming and denying. If you’re wrong, admit it and get on to the solution or the next step. •Three Benefits of Pausing >Pausing before you speak has three specific benefits. The first is that you avoid the risk of interrupting the prospect if he or she has just stopped to gather his or her thoughts. Remember, your primary job in the sales conversation is to build and maintain a high level of trust, and listening builds trust. When you pause for a few seconds, you often find the prospect will continue speaking. He will give you more information and further opportunity to listen, enabling you to gather more of the information you need to make the sale. •Face Up to Mistakes >Second, non-creative people think that it is a sign of weakness to say, “I made a mistake.” On the contrary, it is actually a sign of mental maturity, personal strength and individual character. Remember, everybody makes mistakes every single day . •Be Flexible With New Information>The third statement that creative people use easily is, “I changed my mind.” It is amazing how many uncomfortable situations people get into and stay in because they are unwilling or afraid to admit that they’ve changed their minds. . •Be Willing to Cut Your Losses >If you get new information or if you find that you feel differently about a previous decision, accept that you have changed your mind and don’t let anyone or anything back you into a corner. If a decision does not serve your best interests as you see them now, have the ego-strength and the courage to “cut your losses,” to change your mind and then get on to better things •Action Exercises >Here are two ways you can break out of narrow thinking patterns and become more creative. First, be willing to admit that you are not perfect, you make mistakes, you are wrong on a regular basis. This is a mark of intelligence and courage. Second, with new information, be willing to change your mind. Most of what you know about your business today will change completely in the coming years so be the first to recognize it

Magical six- rules for human to human contact

1 Remember you are working with people: Don’t exhaust them. People aren’t machines. Treat them with dignity and respect. 2 Listen to and talk with your people: Be inclusive. Do it frequently. Value and develop people skills in supervisors and managers. 3 Fix things promptly: Don’t let issues fester. Keep people informed of progress. 4 Make sure your paperwork is worth having: Keep it current. Make sure it’s meaningful. 5 Measure and monitor risks that people are exposed to: Don’t just react to incidents: fix things before incidents happen. Control risks at their source. 6 Keep checking that what you are doing is working effectively: Are you achieving what you think you are?

Golden Platinum Rules

We have all heard of the Golden Rule-and many people aspire to live by it. The Golden Rule is not a panacea. Think about it: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” The Golden Rule implies the basic assumption that other people would like to be treated the way that you would like to be treated

 

Now the Tony Allesandra’s Platinum rule says : “Treat others the way they want to be treated.” Ah hah! What a difference. The Platinum Rule accommodates the feelings of others. The focus of relationships shifts from “this is what I want, so I’ll give everyone the same thing” to “let me first understand what they want and then I’ll give it to them.”….understand what drives people and recognize your options for dealing with them…

 

So the Double Platinum rule is (you guessed it), “treat others the way they don’t even know they want to be treated”. Anticipate their needs, not just  felt and expressed., but unknown but real and hidden ones too..and exceed the expectations and not just do you job..

 

Directors >

Directors are driven by two governing needs: to control and achieve. Directors are goal-oriented go-getters who are most comfortable when they are in charge of people and situations. They want to accomplish many things-now-so they focus on no-nonsense approaches to bottom-line results.

 

Directors seek expedience and are not afraid to bend the rules. They figure it is easier to beg forgiveness than to ask permission. Directors accept challenges, take authority, and plunge head first into solving problems. They are fast-paced, task-oriented, and work quickly and impressively by themselves, which means they become annoyed with delays.

 

Directors are driven and dominating, which can make them stubborn, impatient, and insensitive to others. Directors are so focused that they forget to take the time to smell the roses.

 

Socializers >

Socializers are friendly, enthusiastic “party-animals” who like to be where the action is. They thrive on the admiration, acknowledgment, and compliments that come with being in the lime-light.

 

The Socializer’s primary strengths are enthusiasm, charm, persuasiveness, and warmth. They are idea-people and dreamers who excel at getting others excited about their vision. They are eternal optimists with an abundance of charisma. These qualities help them influence people and build alliances to accomplish their goals.

 

Socializers do have their weaknesses: impatience, an aversion to being alone, and a short attention span. Socializers are risk-takers who base many of their decisions on intuition, which is not inherently bad. Socializers are not inclined to verify information; they are more likely to assume someone else will do it.

 

Thinkers >

Thinkers are analytical, persistent, systematic people who enjoy problem-solving. Thinkers are detail-oriented, which makes them more concerned with content than style. Thinkers are task-oriented people who enjoy perfecting processes and working toward tangible results. They’re always in control of their emotions and may become uncomfortable around people who very out-going, e.g., Socializers.

 

Thinkers have high expectations of themselves and others, which can make them over-critical. Their tendency toward perfectionism-taken to an extreme-can cause “paralysis by over-analysis.” Thinkers are slow and deliberate decision-makers. They do research, make comparisons, determine risks, calculate margins of error, and then take action. Thinkers become irritated by surprises and glitches, hence their cautious decision-making. Thinkers are also skeptical, so they like to see promises in writing.

 

Relaters >

Relaters are warm and nurturing individuals. They are the most people-oriented of the four styles. Relaters are excellent listeners, devoted friends, and loyal employees. Their relaxed disposition makes them approachable and warm. They develop strong networks of people who are willing to be mutually supportive and reliable. Relaters are excellent team players.

 

Relaters are risk-aversive. In fact, Relaters may tolerate unpleasant environments rather than risk change. They like the status quo and become distressed when disruptions are severe. When faced with change, they think it through, plan, and accept it into their world. Relaters-more than the other types-strive to maintain personal composure, stability, and balance.

In the office, Relaters are courteous, friendly, and willing to share responsibilities. They are good planners, persistent workers, and good with follow-through.

 

Relaters go along with others even when they do not agree because they do not want to rock the boat.

 

Here comes another way of looking at it

 

Attraction  The ignition of desire

 Bargaining  Weighing the possibilities with close friends

 Submission  Jumping in

 Perks   Relishing in the “benefits” of the relationship

 The Tipping Point Where it starts to go downhill

 Purgatory  The culmination of annoyances

 Confrontation  Ending the relationship

 Fallout  The unavoidable backlash

 Coexistence  Letting go and moving on

100ActionPrinciples By Bill FitzPatrick

Crux of the book that might remind yourself what all will help you in your journey to succes

Your Appeal shd be appreciated atleast by you  Write A Personal  Work At Wo r k   Walk The Talk  Venture Outside The Box  Use the Power of Patience   Understand Courage   Treasure the Earth GoGREEN   Think Wi n – Wi n   Thank Your Ancestors   Teach Our Childre n …   Submit to a Higher Power   Stay Fit and Healthy   Stay Centere d   Show Loyalty   Set Goals   Save Face of yours and your team  S p read Your Enthusiasm   S h a re the Cre d i t   Run the Short Road   Risk Failure   Reward Hardwork, work hard too  Respect and Defend All Life   Remain Adaptable   Relax Your Body   Rejoice In the Day   Record Your Thoughts   Read, Read, Read   Read Biographies   Retire Early   Practice Peace   Practice Forgiveness   Promote   Observe and Be Aware   Offer Freely   Negotiate With Power  Master Success   Make Today Special   Make Everyone Feel Important  Maintain Your Presence  Maintain A Positive March the Long Road  Love Many Things  Look in the Mirror   Listen to Your Instincts  Let Them Be  Lead by Example  Learn  Invest In Your Future  Imagine   Honor The Military  Hold Sacred …  Heed the Wa rn i n g s  Have Faith  Give Yourself the Gift of  Give Generously  Get Tough  Follow Your Code of Honor  Follow Through  Focus on Your Strengths   Face Fear  Forget Everybody  Enjoy Quiet Ti me  Embody Integrity  Don’t Complicate Matters   Don’t Be A Perfectionist  Do What You Love Doing  Do What Others Can’t  Divide and Conquer   Develop Your Special Talent  Develop Your Sense of Humor  Develop Winning Habits   Demonstrate Your Love  Count the Time  Communicate with Ease  Commit to Never Ending Close the Door on the Past  Cause Change  Call to Action  Control Conflict  Build Your Team   Build Networks  Become Grateful  Be the Warrior  Be Prudent   Be Proud   Be Persistent   Be Open to New Ideas   Be Frugal   Be Decisive   Be A Mentor  Avoid negative thoughts and thinkers Ask yourself before you question others Ask questions a lot  Appreciate your customers  Applaud the beginner  Allow you opponent oppurtunity to be heard  Act with boldness, be couragious  Act as your Feel, respect intuition Accept Differences

Just do it. Eat that Frog Brian Tracy

Just do it. Eat that Frog Brian Tracy

Galileo once wrote,
“You cannot teach a person something he does not already know; you can only bring what he does know to his awareness.”

Success Is Predictable
Simply put, some people are doing better than others because they do things differently and they do the right things right.

A Simple Truth
The ability to concentrate single-mindedly on your most important task, to do it well and to finish it completely, is the key to great success, achievement, respect, status and happiness in life.
YOU will never be able to do everything you have to do

The Need to Be Selective
An average person who develops the habit of setting clear priorities and getting important tasks completed quickly will run circlesaround a genius who talks a lot and makes wonderful plans but who gets very little done.

Your “frog” is your biggest, most important task, the one you are most likely to procrastinate on if you don’t do something about it.

The first rule of frog-eating is: “If you have to eat two frogs, eat the ugliest one first.”
The second rule of frog-eating is: “If you have to eat a live frog at all, it doesn’t pay to sit and look at it for very long.”

SO, if you have two important tasks before you, start with the biggest, hardest and most important task first. Discipline yourself to begin immediately and then to persist until the task is complete before you go on to something else  .you are paid and promoted for getting specific, measurable results Many people confuse activity with accomplishment.
The habit of setting priorities, overcoming procrastination and getting on with your most important task is a mental and physical skill.With practice, you can learn any behavior or develop any habit that you consider either desirable or necessary. The three key qualities to develop the habits decision, discipline, and determination.

“Think on paper.”
“There is one quality that one must possess to win, and that is definiteness of purpose, the knowledge of what one wants and a burning desire to achieve it.” Napoleon Hill
Clarity is perhaps the most important concept in personal productivity.A major reason for procrastination and lack of motivation is vagueness, confusion and fuzzy mindedness about what it is you are trying to do, and in what order and for what reason.
Goals are the fuel in the furnace of achievement.> Decide exactly what you want. Write it down.  Set a deadline on your goal . Make a list of everything that you can think of that you
are going to have to do to achieve your goal. . Organize the list into a plan [by priority and sequence] Take action on your plan immediately.  Resolve to do something every single day that moves
you toward your major goal
“One of the very worst uses of time is to do something very well that need not be done at all.” Stephen Covey says that, “Before you begin scrambling up the ladder of success, make sure that it is leaning against the right building

Plan Every Day In Advance
Q:”How do you eat an elephant?”A:”One bite at a time!”
“Planning is bringing the future into the present so you can do something about it now.” Alan Lakein
Alex Mackenzie wrote, “Action without planning is the cause of every failure.”
Your mind, your ability to think, plan and decide, is your most powerful tool for overcoming procrastination and increasing your productivity  .The more time you take to make written lists of everything you have to do, in advance, the more effective and efficient you will be
Adopt Six “P” Formula. It says, “Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance.”
10/90 Rule says that the first 10% of time that you spend planning and organizing your work, before you begin, will save you as much as 90% of the time in getting the job done once you get started.

Apply Pareto Principle -“Resist the temptation to clear up small things first.”
“We always have time enough, if we will but use it aright.” Wolfgang Von Goethe
80/20 Rule >”vital few,” the top 20% in terms of money and influence, and the “trivial many,” the bottom 80%. 20% of your activities will account for 80% of your results.So universally 20 Pct value accounts for 80 Pct volume.
The most valuable tasks you can do each day are often the hardest and most complex and these invariably payoff and reward tremendously
Just thinking about starting and finishing an important task motivates you and helps you to overcome procrastination
If you procrastinate on important things they become urgent

Consider the Consequences-“Long-term thinking improves short-term decision making.”
“Every man has become great; every successful man has succeeded, in proportion as he has confined his powers to one particular channel.” Orison Swett Marden
The potential consequences of any task or activity are the key determinants of how important it really is to you and to your company.
“long-time perspective” is the most accurate single predictor of upward social and economic mobility;future-orientation of the consequences of your actions.
“What are the potential consequences of doing or not doing this task?” “Future intent influences and often determines present actions.”

Think about the Long Term
“Failures do what is tension relieving while winners do what is goal achieving.”
Motivation requires motive.the time is going to pass anyway. The only question is how you use it and where you are going to end up at the end of the weeks and months
“There is never enough time to do everything, but there is always enough time to do the most important thing.”
“There will never be enough time to do everything you have to do.”

Deadlines Are an Excuse
Sometimes the job actually takes much longer to complete when people rush to get the job done at the last minute and then have to redo it
The question is “What are my highest value activities?””What can I and only I do, that if done well, will make a real difference?” “What is the most valuable use of my
time, right now?”
Peter Drucker said DO ONLY ,What can you, and only you do, that if done well, can make a real difference!!
As Goethe said, “The things that matter most must never be at the mercy of the things that matter least.” “Just begin and the mind grows heated;continue, and the task will be completed!”

Practice Creative Procrastination “You can only get your time and your life under control to the degree to which you discontinue lower value activities.”
“Make time for getting big tasks done every day. Plan your daily workload in advance. Single out the relatively few small jobs that absolutely must be done immediately in the morning. Then go directly to the big tasks and pursue them to completion.” Boardroom Reports
The fact is that you can’t do everything that you have to do. You have to procrastinate on something! Therefore, procrastinate on small tasks
A priority is something that you do more of and sooner, while a posteriority is something that you do less of and later, if at all.
Say it politely and courteously. “No!” Say it early and say it often.

Procrastinate on Purpose
Most people engage in unconscious procrastination.set posteriorities wherever and whenever you can.

Use the ABCDE Method Continually
“The first law of success is concentration – to bend all the energies to one point, and to go directly to that point, looking neither to the right or to the left.” William Mathews
An “A” item is defined as something that is very important. This is something that you must do. This is a task for which there can be serious consequences if you do it or fail to do it  If you have more than one “A” task, you prioritize these tasks by
writing A-1, A-2, A-3, and so on in front of each item
A “B” item is defined as a task that you should do. But it only has mild consequences. These are the tadpoles of your work life. This means that someone may be unhappy or inconvenienced if you don’t do it, but it is nowhere as important as an “A” task. The rule is that you should never do a “B” task when there is an “A”
task left undone
A “C” task is defined as something that would be nice to do, but for which there are no consequences at all, whether you do it or not. This  has no affect at all on your work life.
A “D” task is defined as something you can delegate to someone else. The rule is that you should delegate everything that anyone else can do so that you can free up more time for the “A” tasks that only you can do.
An “E” task is defined as something that you can eliminate altogether and it won’t make any real difference
But every minute that you spend on an “E” task is time taken away from a task or activity that can make a real difference in your life

Focus On Key Result Areas
“When every physical and mental resource is focused, one’s power to solve a problem multiplies tremendously.” Norman Vincent Peale
In its simplest terms, you have been hired to get specific results

The Big Seven
key result areas of management are: Planning,Organizing, Staffing, Delegating, Supervising, Measuring andReporting
key result areas of salespeople are: Prospecting, Building Rapport and Trust, Identifying Needs, Presenting Persuasively, Answering Objections, Closing the Sale, and Getting Resales and Referrals

Clarity Is Essential
The starting point of high performance is for you to first of all identify the key result areas of your work The employee’s ability to perform these tasks quickly and efficiently largely determines her pay and promotability.

Give Yourself a Grade
Grade yourself on a scale of 1-10 in each of those of your key result areas .Your weakest key result area sets the height at which you can use all your other skills and abilities
The better you become in a particular skill area, the more motivated you will be to perform that function, the less you will procrastinate and the more determined you will be to get it finished

The Great Question
“What one skill, if I developed and did it in an excellent fashion, would have the greatest positive impact on my career?” The good news is that all business skills are learnable .Never stop improving

The Law of Three
““Do what you can with what you have right where you are.” Theodore Roosevelt

One Thing All Day Long
“Once I had made up this list, you then told me to ask this question, ‘If you could only do one thing on this list, all day long, which one task would contribute the greatest value to your company?’ 90% of the value that you contribute to your company is contained in those TOP three tasks
Your rewards, both financial and emotional, will always be in direct proportion to your results, to the value of your contribution.It is quality of time at work that counts and quantity of time at home that matters.

When you go to work, put your head down and work the whole time. Start a little earlier, stay a little later, and work a little harder. Don’t waste time ..By not working effectively and efficiently during your workday, you create unnecessary stress and you deprive the members of your family of the very best person you can possibly be.

Prepare Thoroughly Before You Begin.“You miss every shot you don’t take.” Wayne Gretsky,

“No matter what the level of your ability, you have more potential than you can ever develop in a lifetime.” James T. McKay
When you are fully prepared, you are like a cocked gun or an archer with an arrow pulled back taut in the bow. You just need one small mental push to get started on your highest value tasks.
Once you have completed your preparations, it is essential that you launch immediately toward your goals. Get started. Do the first thing, whatever it is.  Don’t expect perfection the first time, or even the first few times. “get it 80% right and then correct it later.”

Take It One Oil Barrel at A Time
“Persons with comparatively moderate powers will accomplish much if they apply themselves wholly and indefatigably to one thing at a time.” Samuel Smiles
Confucius wrote that, “A journey of a thousand leagues begins with a single step.”

Take It One Step at a Time. Your job is to go as far as you can see. You will then see far enough to go further.

Upgrade Your Key Skills
“The only certain means of success is to render more and better service than is expected of you, no matter what your task may be.” Og Mandino
Pat Riley, said, “If you’re not getting better, you’re getting worse.”

Never Stop Learning .“Continuous learning is the minimum requirement for success in any field.”
One of the most helpful of all time management techniques is for you to get better at your key tasks. One piece of information or one additional skill can make an enormous difference in your ability to do the job well.

Three Steps to Mastery
First, read in your field for at least one hour every day Second, take every course and seminar available on key skills that can help you Third, listen to educational/developmental programs ,say while drving.The more you learn and know, the more confident and motivated  you feel .And there is no limit to how far or how fast you can advance except for the limits you place on your own imagination.

Leverage Your Special Talents
“Do your work. Not just your work and no more, but a little more for the lavishings sake – that little more that is worth all the rest.” Dean Briggs
There are certain things that you can do, or that you can learn to do, that can make you extraordinarily valuable to yourself and to others.

Increase Your Earning Ability .
Take stock of your unique talents and abilities on a regular basis. What is it that you do especially well? What are you good at? What do you do easily and well that is difficult for other people?

Do What You Love to Do
What is it that you enjoy the most about your work?  What is it that you do that gets you the most compliments and praise from other people? You cannot do everything but you can do those few things in which you excel, the few things that can really make a difference.

Identify Your Key Constraints .Why aren’t you at your goal already?
“Concentrate all your thoughts on the task at hand. The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.” Alexander Graham Bell
Ask yourself these questions: What is holding you back? What sets the speed at which you achieve your goals? What determines how fast you move from where you are to where you want to go?
Whatever you have to do, there is always a limiting factor that determines how quickly and well you get it done.

The accurate identification of the limiting factor in any process and the focus on that factor can usually bring about more progress in a shorter period of time than any other single activity.
80% of the constraints, the factors that are holding you back from achieving your goals, are internal. They are within yourself, within your own personal qualities, abilities, habits, disciplines or competencies Only 20% of the limiting factors are external outside, in the form of competition, markets, governments or other organizations

Look Into Yourself
“What is it in me that is holding me back?” The failure to identify the correct constraint, or the identification of the wrong constraint, can lead you off in the wrong direction.
Often, starting off your day with the removal of a key bottleneck or constraint fills you full of energy and personal power

Put the Pressure on Yourself “No one is coming to the rescue/motivate.”
“The first requisite for success is to apply your physical and mental energies to one problem incessantly without growing weary.” Thomas Edison
Only about 2% of people can work entirely without supervision. We call these people “leaders.” and others of ofcourse continue as followers
The standards you set for your own work and behavior should be higher than anyone else could set for you. Always look for ways to go the extra mile, to do more than you are paid for
Then race against your own clock. Beat your own deadlines

Maximize Your Personal Powers
“Gather in your resources, rally all your faculties, marshal all your energies, focus all your capacities upon mastery of at least one field of endeavor.” John Haggai
Overworking Can Mean Underproducing
The more tired you become, the worse will be the quality of your work and the more mistakes you will make.
At a certain point, like a battery that is run down, you can reach “the wall” and simply be unable to continue.

Work at Your Own Pace
There are specific times during the day when you are at your best for certain things you. Take at least one full day off every week. It is true that “a change is as good as a rest.”
Aim to exercise 30 minutes per day, to Guard Your Physical Health By eating lean and healthy, exercising regularly and getting lots of rest, you’ll get more and better work done, easier and with greater satisfaction than ever before.
Motivate Yourself into Action .Optimistic people seem to be more effective.
“It is in the compelling zest of high adventure and of victory, and of creative action that man finds his supreme joys.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery
Most of your emotions, positive or negative, are determined by how you talk to yourself on a minute-to-minute basis. It is not what happens to you but the way that you interpret the things that are happening to you that determines how you feel  .You should talk to yourself positively all the time to boost your self-esteem.
“The last great freedom of mankind is the freedom to choose your attitude under any set of external conditions.” Victor Frankl
“You should never share your problems with others because 80% of people don’t care about them anyway, and the other 20% are kind of glad that you’ve got them in the first place.”
1. look for the good in every situation 2. difficulties come not to obstruct, but to instruct. 3.look for the solution to every problem 4.continually visualize your goals and ideals and talk to  yourself in a positive way,

Get Out Of the Technological Time Sinks .Don’t Become Addicted
“There is more to life than just increasing its speed.” Ghandhi
Technology can be your best friend or your worst enemy .Technology is meant to help us to improve the quality of our lives by enabling us to accomplish our key tasks and communicate with the key people in our world faster and more efficiently than ever before you need to detach on a regular basis from the technology and communication devices that can overwhelm you if you are not careful

Continuous Contact Is Not Essential
Refuse to Be a Slave. Technology is there to help you, not to hinder you,  A Servant, Not a Master .Keep asking yourself, “What’s important here?”
Maintain your “inner calm” by forcing yourself to stop on a regular basis and “listen to the silence.”
There are very few things that are so important that they cannot wait.“If it is really important, someone will tell you.”

Slice and Dice the Task-Develop a Compulsion to Closure
“The beginning of a habit is like an invisible thread, but every time we repeat the act we strengthen the strand, add to it another filament, until it becomes a great cable and binds us irrevocably in thought and act.” Orison Swett Marden
you lay out the task in detail and then resolve to do just one slice of the job for the time being, like eating a roll of salami, one slice at a time ;once you have started and completed a single part of the job, you will feel like doing just one more “slice.”
And the bigger the task you start and complete, the better and more elated you feel .Each small step forward energizes you
You Swiss cheese a task when you resolve to work for a specific time period on a task. This may be as little as five or ten minutes, after which you will stop and do something else .Once you start working, you develop a sense of forward momentum and a feeling of accomplishment. Don’t delay. Try it today!

Create Large Chunks of Time-Make Every Minute Count
“Nothing can add more power to your life than concentrating all of your energies on a limited set of targets.” Nido Qubein
Your ability to create and carve out these blocks of high value, highly productive time, is central to your ability to make a significant contribution to your work and your life.
Remember, the pyramids were built one block at a time.Use travel and transition time, what is often called “gifts of time” ,deliberately and creatively organize,to complete small chunks of larger tasks.

Develop A Sense of Urgency
“Do not wait; the time will never be ‘just right.’ Start where you stand, and work with whatever tools you may have at your command, and better tools will be found as you go along.” Napoleon Hill
Highly productive people take the time to think, plan and set priorities. They then launch quickly and strongly toward their goals and objectives. They work steadily, smoothly and continuously  One of the ways you can trigger this state of flow is by developing a “sense of urgency.” This is an inner drive and desire to get on with the job quickly and get it done fast .You focus on specific steps you can take immediately

Build Up a Sense of Momentum-Do It Now!
Although it may take tremendous amounts of energy to overcome inertia and get started initially, it then takes far less energy to keep going.
Nothing will help you more in your career than for you to get the reputation for being the kind of person who gets important work done quickly and well

Single Handle Every Task
“And herein lies the secret of true power. Learn, by constant practice, how to husband your resources, and concentrate them, at any given moment, upon a given point.” James Allen
Your ability to select your most important task, to begin it and then to concentrate on it single mindedly until it is complete is the key to high levels of performance and personal productivity

Once You Get Going, Keep Going
keep working at the task, without diversion or distraction, until the job is 100% complete.Persistence is actually self-discipline in action
The truth is that once you have decided on your number one task, anything else that you do other than that is a relative waste of time
Elbert Hubbard defined self discipline as, “The ability to make yourself do what you should do, when you should do it, whether you feel like it or not.”

Thoughts By Brian Tracy:Dealing With Overwhelm

  •Too Much to Do, Too Little Time :The most common form of stress that managers experience is the feeling of being overwhelmed with far too much to do and having too little time to do it in. In fact, “time poverty” is the biggest single problem facing most managers in America today. We simply do not have enough time to fulfill all our responsibilities. Because of budget limitations, staff cutbacks, downsizing, and competitive pressures, individual managers are forced to take on more and more work, all of which appears to be indispensable to the smooth functioning of our company or department. •Become An Expert :The solution to this problem of work overload is for you to become an expert on time management. There is probably no other skill that you can learn that will give you a “bigger bang for the buck” than to become extremely knowledgeable and experienced in using time management practices. •Be Open to New Ideas :The most foolish manager of all is either the manager who feels that he has no time to learn about time management or, even worse, the manager who, while being overwhelmed with work, feels that he already knows all that he needs to know about the subject. •Never Stop Learning :The fact is that you can study time management and take time management courses for your entire business life and you will still never learn everything you need to know to get the most out of yourself while doing your job in the most efficient way. •The Keys to Time Management :The two indispensable keys to time management are: 1) the ability to set priorities; and 2) the ability to concentrate single-mindedly on one thing at a time. Since there is never enough time to do everything that needs to be done, you must be continually setting priorities on your activities. Perhaps the very best question that you can memorize and repeat, over and over, is, “what is the most valuable use of my time right now?” •The Best Question of All :This question, “what is the most valuable use of my time right now?” will do more to keep you on track, hour by hour, than any other single question in the list of time management strategies. •Start With Your Top Tasks :The natural tendency for all of us is to major in minors and to give in to the temptation to clear up small things first. After all, small things are easier and they are often more fun than the big, important things that represent the most valuable use of your time. •However, the self-discipline of organizing your work and focusing on your highest value tasks is the starting point of getting your time under control and lowering your stress levels. •Action Exercises :Here are two things you can do immediately to get your time under control. First, make a decision today to become an expert on time management. Read the books, listen to the audio programs, and take a time management course. Then, practice, practice, practice every day until you master time management skills. Second, set clear priorities on your work each day, before you begin. Then, discipline yourself to start on your most important task and stay at that until it is complete. This will relieve much of your stress immediately.

Napoleon Hill in his book, “Law of Success”, says

Napoleon Hill ‘s The Fifteen Laws of Success

1. A Definite Chief Aim. This will teach you how to save the wasted effort which
the majority of people expend in trying to find their life-work. The goal is to
forever to do away with aimlessness and to fix your heart and hand upon
some definite, well conceived purpose as a life work.
2. Self-Confidence. Self-confidence will help you master the six basic fears
which most of us pick-up in life – the fear of Poverty, the fear of Ill-Health, the
fear of Old Age, the fear of Criticism, the fear of Loss of Love of Someone and
the fear of Death. The goal is to learn the difference between egotism and real
self-confidence which is based upon definite, usable knowledge.
3. Habit of Saving. Will teach you how to distribute your income systematically
so that a definite percentage of it will steadily accumulate, thus forming one of
the greatest known sources of personal power. According to Hill no one may
succeed in life without saving money. There is no exception to this rule, and
no one may escape it!
4. Initiative and Leadership This law will show you how to become a leader
instead of a follower in your chosen field of endeavour. It will develop in you
the instinct for leadership which will cause you gradually to gravitate to the top
in all undertakings that you participate.
5. Imagination will stimulate your mind so that you will conceive new ideas and
develop new plans which will help you in attaining the object of your Definite
Chief Aim. This law will show you how to create new ideas out of old, well
known concepts, and how to put old ideas to new uses.
6. Enthusiasm will enable you to ‘saturate’ all with whom you come in contact
with interest in you and your ideas. Enthusiasm is the foundation of a Pleasing
Personality, and you must have such a personality in order to influence others
to co-operate with you.
7. Self-Control is the ‘balance wheel’ with which you control your enthusiasm
and direct it where you wish it to carry you.
8. The Habit of doing more than paid for is one of the most important lessons
of the Law of Success. This will teach you how to take advantage of the Law
of Increasing Returns, which will eventually insure you a return in money far
out of proportion to the service you render. The true leader is one that
continually practices the habit of doing more work and better work than that
for which he or she is paid for.
9. Pleasing Personality is the ‘fulcrum’ on which you must place the ‘crowbar’
of your efforts, and when so placed, with intelligence, it will enable you to
remove mountains of obstacles. To develop as a leader it is vital to possess a
pleasing personality.
10. Accurate Thinking is one of the important foundation stones of all enduring
success. This teaches you how to separate ‘facts’ from mere ‘information’. It
teaches you how to organise known facts into two classes: the ‘important’ and
the ‘unimportant’ fact.
11. Concentration is all about how to focus your attention upon one subject at a
time until you have worked out practical plans for mastering that subject.
Concentration will teach you how to ally yourself with others in such a manner
that you may have the use of their entire knowledge to back you up in your
own plans and purposes.
12. Co-operation will teach you the value of teamwork in all you do. Co-operation
will teach you the value of co-ordinating your own efforts with others by
putting aside friction, jealousy, strife, envy and cupidity.
13. Profiting by Failure will teach you how to make stepping stones out of all
your past and future mistakes and failures. It will teach you the difference
between’ failure’ and ’temporary defeat’, a difference which is very great and
very important. It will teach you how to profit from your own failures and by the
failures of others.
14. Tolerance will teach you how to avoid the disastrous effects of racial and
religious prejudices which mean defeat for millions of people who permit
themselves to become entangled in foolish argument over these subjects,
thereby poisoning their own minds and closing the door, to reason and
investigation. This law is the twin brother of the law Accurate Thought, for the
reason that no one may become an accurate thinker without practicing
tolerance. Intolerance makes enemies of those who should be friends,
destroys opportunity and fills the mind with doubt, mistrust and prejudice.
15. Practicing the Golden Rule will teach you how to make use of the great
universal law of human conduct in such a manner that you may easily get
harmonious co-operation from any individual or group of individuals. The
Golden Rule is essentially, to do unto others, as you would wish them to do
unto you if your positions were reversed.

Titbits from TOLERANCE by Napoleon Hill

THERE are souls in this world which have the gift of finding joy everywhere, and of leaving it behind them everywhere they go.- Faber. “You Can Do It if You Believe You Can!” Intolerance is a form of ignorance which must be mastered before any form of enduring success may be attained It dethrones reason and substitutes mob psychology in its place Intolerance is the chief disintegrating force in the organized religions of the world, where it plays havoc with the greatest power for good there is on this earth; by breaking up that power into small sects and denominations which spend as much effort opposing each other as they do in destroying the evils of the world. Hearts, like doors, can ope with ease, To very, very little keys; And don’t forget that they are these: “I thank you, sir,” and “If you please.” Factors which constitute the chief controlling forces of civilization. One is physical heredity and the other is social heredity The teachers and professors were forced to implant the ideal of “kultur” in the minds of the students, and out of this teaching, in a single generation, grew the capacity for sacrifice of the individual for the interest of the nation which surprised the modern world. IT takes but a second to administer a rebuke, but it may take a life-time for the one who has been rebuked to forget it. The first question we ask about a new acquaintance is not, “Who are you?” but, “What have you?” And the next question we ask is, “How can we get that which you have?”War grows out of the desire of the individual to gain advantage at the expense of his fellow men, and the smoldering embers of this desire are fanned into a flame through the grouping of these individuals who place the interests of the group above those of other groups UNFORTUNATE, in-deed, is the man who becomes so used to evil that it no longer appears to be horrible “Thou shalt not kill!” Greatly begin! though thou have time, But for a line, be that sublime – Not failure, but low aim is crime. it is woman’s nature to subordinate the interests of the present to those of the future. It is woman’s nature to implant, in the mind of the young, ideals that will accrue to the benefit of generations yet unborn, while man is motivated generally by expediency of the present. SINGLENESS of pur-pose is one of the chief essentials for success in life, no matter what may be one’s aim. -John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Under the stress of war, that great mass of humanity was reduced to a common level where they fought shoulder to shoulder, side by side, without asking any questions as to each other’s racial tendencies or religious beliefs. We learned from the world war that we cannot destroy a part without weakening the whole; that when one nation or group of people is reduced to poverty and want, the remainder of the world suffers, also. Stated conversely, we learned from the world war that co-operation and tolerance are the very foundation of enduring success Books and lessons, in themselves, are of but little value; their real value, if any, lies not in their printed pages, but in the possible action which they may arouse in the reader. For Any learning > value to you will depend entirely upon the extent to which it stimulates you to think and to act as you would not have done without its influence The chief object of course is to educate, more than it is to inform – meaning by the word “educate” to educe, to draw out! to cause you to use the power that lies sleeping within you, awaiting the awakening hand of some appropriate stimulus to arouse you to action.!! IF a man has built a sound character it makes but little diff-erence what people say about him, because he will win in the end. – Napoleon Hill, Sr.

 

 TOLERANCE! When the dawn of Intelligence shall have spread its wings over the eastern horizon of progress, and Ignorance and Superstition shall have left their last footprints on the sands of Time, it will be recorded in the book of man’s crimes and mistakes that his most grievous sin was that of Intolerance! The bitterest Intolerance grows out of racial and religious differences of opinion, as the result of early childhood training. How long, O Master of Human Destinies, until we poor mortals will understand the folly of trying to destroy one another because of dogmas and creeds and other superficial matters over which we do not agree? Our allotted time on this earth is but a fleeting moment, at most! Like a candle, we are lighted, shine for a moment and flicker out! Why can we not so live during this short earthly sojourn that when the Great Caravan called Death draws up and announces this visit about finished we will be ready to fold our tents, and, like the Arabs of the Desert, silently follow the Caravan out into the Darkness of the Unknown without fear and trembling? I am hoping that I will find no Jews or Gentiles, Catholics or Protestants, Germans or Englishmen, Frenchmen or Russians, Blacks or Whites, Reds or Yellows, when I shall have crossed the Bar to the Other Side. I am hoping I will find there only human Souls, Brothers and Sisters all, unmarked by race, creed or color, far I shall want to be done with Intolerance so I may lie down and rest an æon or two, undisturbed by the strife, ignorance, superstition and petty mis-understandings which mark with chaos and grief this earthly existence.

TAKE AWAYS FROM Success Secrets Of Self-Made Millionaires by Brian Tracy

If you do what other successful people do, you will achieve like results.
• To become a millionaire, follow the practices of other self-made millionaires.
• Dream big dreams, so you have a long-term vision of what you want.
• Think constantly about your goals.
• See yourself as self-employed, do what you love to do and commit yourself to
excellence.
• Be prepared to work longer and harder, to dedicate yourself to lifelong learning and
to become an expert at what you do.
• Serve others, since all self-made millionaires are dedicated to good customer service.
• Develop a reputation for absolute honesty.
• Concentrate on your highest priorities and work quickly and dependably.
• Practice self-discipline and dedicate yourself to continued improvement

Be willing to persist, regardless of diffi culties, disappointments and setback Never give up, no matter what happens. you will be and the more quickly you will advance
Continually learn and improve The three keys to lifelong learning are: 1) Spend at least 30 to 60minutes a day reading in your fi eld; 2) Listen to audio programs in your car, so you learnon the road, and 3) Attend as many courses and seminars in your fi eld as possible
develop a reputation for speed and a bias for action. do it so fast that you amaze them with yourspeed But get it right the very first time
Fear of failure, not failure itself, is the greatest obstacle to success
Get feedback and quickly make any necessary corrections
Learn how to do your work better, so you become an expert in your fi eld. By becomingan expert, you rise to the top.
Permit yourself to dream ‘Big’ about and imagine the kind of life you would like to livePractice back-from-thefuture thinking by projecting yourself forward fi ve years and imagining that you lead an absolutely perfect life
set priorities and focus on achieving them This single-mindedness can be a hard habit todevelop, but you need the will power, self-discipline and personal character to work onyour highest priority until you complete it
Stay focused when you work. Working hard means starting earlier, staying later and working more intensely.
Take 10% from each paycheck you receive and put it into a special account for fi nancial accumulation. Be very frugaland careful with your money. Question all of your expenses, and delay or defer everyimportant buying decision for a week or even a month.
The more people trust you, the more they will be willingto work for you, give you credit, lend you money and buy your products or services. BUILD trust by honesty/sincerity
The more you focus on achieving your goals, solving your problems and answering tough questions, the smarter you will become The three factors that stimulate creativity are intensely desired goals, pressing problems and focused questions
The more you serve other people, the greater your rewards They think about ALL of your CUSTOMERS constantly, and seek new and better ways to serve them.
throw yourself fully into that work ,that  you really like doing
Two factors that have the most effect in determining what happens to you are what you think about most of the time and how you think about it.Do something every day to move closer to your priority goal’HAVE A CLEAR VISION OF YOUR TARGET’
Whatever you choose to do, resolve to be the best Find out What one skill, if you developed it, would have the greatest effect on your life? and go for it
You are responsible for what happens in your life, so if you don’t like something, you areresponsible for changing it BE not only independent but  self-responsible too
You need to be able to use selfmastery, self-control and self-direction and to delay short-term gratifi cation in order to attain long-term success
You will face ups and downs in your life and career, since all businesslife is made up of cycles.  Be like a mountain climber who climbs a peak and must go down into a valley before climbing the next.
you will take on the attitudes, values, behaviors and beliefs of the people around you The more people you know — or who know you in a positive light — the more successful you can be

Do you want to change the way things are in your life?

Did you know that our thoughts create our reality, this explains why we attract and create what we focus on or what we focus on is what we get. Do you want to change the way things are in your life? There are seven Universal Laws – what are they? 1. Law of Manifestation This law attracts what you create. If your consciousness creates your reality, you simply can’t manifest anything that doesn’t already exist inside you. Everything manifests in your consciousness first, so if you see failure and difficulty around you, that’s a product of your mind. If you see abundance and achievement that’s a force of your own too 2. Law of Magnetism This law concerns what you attract, the power of your energy. This law states that we attract the same kind of energy that we put out about ourselves. This is based on the on the quantum physics principle that everything and everyone projects this power. 3. Law of Pure Desire In order to be aligned with this law, your intention must be pure, not manipulative, fear based or desperate. This means your motivations must be genuine, healthy and honouring to yourself and others. This law states that when you’re driven by a pure intention , free of fear, doubt and desperation—you can be certain of a beneficial outcome. 4. Law of Paradoxical Intent If you are desperate to make something happen that repulsive vibration will push it away, turning away the very people and situations that may have bought about your desired outcome. This law reflects the law of magnetism in warning that you will only get a return of your own negative energy. There’s the paradox. 5. Law of Harmony When you consciously choose to create balance and align yourself with the universe, your intention and energy open the floodgates of universal abundance. To live in balance with the world and tap into the river of abundance, you must be in harmony with yourself first. Note here that the most harmonic and successful emotions are love, peace, acceptance and enthusiasm for your own life. 6. Law of Right Action Your energy is self-perpetuating in the world. Value, honour and dignity will increase in your life to the same degree that you promote them in your environment around you. So with each of your choices, ask yourself, “is this honouring to myself and others?” 7. Law of Expanding Influence This law shows that your own energy expands in the world and has influence in your personal arena and in the world at large. So if you want your family to be more peaceful you must create that intention within yourself first. If you want your workers to be more industrious YOU must begin to project that energy in your own life. In the pursuit of success YOU must be honest, enthusiastic, encouraging and supportive. Practice using these laws in your life and watch what happens. Used correctly these laws will be possibly your most powerful allies to assist you to create the life of your choice.

Customs and Rituals in Hindu way of Life

Most of the Hindu customs are acts followed with a feeling of religiosity. From the cradle to the cremation ground, and for a time even after the body has been cremated the life of a Hindu is a round of customary rituals and ceremonies known as samskaras (sacraments). Regarding the exact number of these samskaras there is a great divergence of views among the smrti writers [ Ancient Hindu law-givers such as Manu, Gautama, Yajnavalkya and others.]. According to some, sixteen samskaras, as they are nitya (usual) must be performed, and the rest twenty-four as they are naimittika (special) ones are left to choice. They are observed by almost all castes, with the use of Vedic text by Brahmans and others, and with Pauranic text by the rest. The chief of these customary rituals are those at birth, thread-girding, marriage, pregnancy and death. The garbhadhana (girl-wife’s coming of age) ceremony, which used to be once performed separately and with great pomp as then girls were married at an early age, has now become a part of the marriage rite and receives scant attention.

Birth.

For her first confinement the young wife generally goes to her parents’ house. It is her privilege to do so. As a rule a pregnant woman is given whatever food she desires for and her longings (dohale) are noticed and promptly satisfied by the family elders. She is, however, advised to abstain from abnormally hot or hard- to-digest food. At the inception of labour-pains she repairs to an inner chamber in the house which has been swept clean and kept warm, dim-lighted and free from draught. A midwife generally known to the family and reputed for her skill in midwifery is called in and she attends the parturient from then onwards for ten or more days. The delivery usually takes place on the floor, no cot being used. After delivery, the position of the mother is not changed for some time. If the child is a boy the midwife beats a metal dish and the joyful news is carried to friends and kinsfolk with distribution of packets of sugar. When parturition is delayed so to cause anxiety, it is still a practice among the ignorant to solicit help of bhagats or mantriks for their esoteric charms or specific prescriptions. As soon as the child is born cold water is sprinkled over it to ‘awaken’ it. After a while the midwife ties the child’s umbilical cord with a cotton thread a few inches away from the navel and severs it with a knife, touches the wound with ashes and lays the child on a supa (winnowing fan). She then rubs the mother and child with turmeric and oil, bathes them with hot water, swathes the child in cloth bandages and leaves them to rest on a cot under which a small fire of live coals is set. The mother is given butter and myrrh pills, and the child is dosed with a few drops of castor oil and honey. Myrrh-incense is burnt and waved all over and the mother is purified with a fumigation of Vavding (Embelia ribes) and Balant-shopa (anise) in the room. All visitors sprinkle some drops of cow’s urine on their feet before entering the lying-in room as a precaution against evil spirits trying to enter with them. The after-birth is put in an earthen pot with a pice, a little turmeric and red powder, and buried in a hole dug outside the mother’s room and near the bath-water drain. The mother starts suckling the child only from the fourth day and the child is for the first three days nursed by giving it the end of a rag resting in a saucer of rice-broth and molasses to suck. During the period the mother is fed on saltless vegetarian diet. On the fourth day the mother and the child undergo a special bath and thence the mother starts suckling the child, herself taking to a full nutritious diet.

Panchavi and Sathi.

The first ritual as such in an infant’s life comes on the night of the fifth or sixth day after birth. The ceremony is known as the worship of Pancavi (Mother Fifth) and Sathi (Mother Sixth) and is observed among all communities. It is not a Vedic samskara and as such the configuration worshipped and the offerings made differ according to region, community and family. But a common belief exists that those nights are full of danger to the new-born child, and only by worshipping Mother Fifth and Sixth can the child be saved from convulsive seizures and most other forms of disease which are believed to be the work of evil spirits lurking in the lying-in room to attack the child.

The mother is held impure for ten days and no one except the midwife touches her. The family observes suher (ceremonial impurity) for the period. On the eleventh day the mother and the child are given a purificatory hath, their clothes washed and the whole house is cleaned. The walls and the ground of the lying-in room are smeared with a mixture of cowdung and water, the bathing place is washed and turmeric, red powder, flowers and lighted lamp are laid near it. The midwife is presented with a lugade, coli and money. The mother is cleansed of the impurity by a sprinkle of pancagavya or tulasi water, and men change their sacred thread. Many of these practises, however, get naturally avoided in case the woman has her delivery in a modern nursing home or lying-in hospital which now-a-days forms part of urban life and necessity.

In rural parts the mother worships the well when she goes thereto fetch water for the first time after her parturition. She offers turmeric and red powder to the well, makes obeisance and returns home with a well-cleaned pot filled with water.

The Naming.

The barse or naming ceremony which is generally held on the 12th day in the evening after birth is an important event in the child’s life. The karnavedha (boring of the ear-lobes) ceremony may take place in the morning that day or it may be postponed to the sixth or twelfth month. In the evening women neighbours, friends and kinswomen who are invited to attend the naming drop in, each with a present for the child and the mother. The child is then ceremonially cradled and named and the function closes with the distribution of boiled gram and packets of sweetmeat to the assembled.

Chaula.

The next ritual consists of the hair-cutting ceremony known as caula or cudakarana as mentioned in the Hindu Samskaras. It is also customary with many Hindu backward communities to give ceremonial attention to the first shaving or cutting of the child’s hair (javal) and is based on the belief that the hair with which the child is born are impure. At present among Brahmans the rite is usually gone through in the case of boys at the time of upanayana (thread-girding).

Among the well-to-do it is customary to celebrate the child’s birthday every month during the first year and then annually for some years. Even the various stages of development in the child, such as, learning to turn on one side, crawling, sitting, standing, etc., are sometimes celebrated by the family with feasting.

Thread-girding.

The thread-girding ceremony or munja as it is popularly known is a samskara prescribed for all Hindus claiming a place in the first three varnas (caste-groups). In essence it is a purificatory rite initiating a boy to bramhacaryasram (stage of student-hood). In Kolaba the castes besides Brahmans which are supposed to gird their boys with sacred thread are Prabhus and Sonars. Recently the ceremony is found to have been observed by Varus. Marathas generally are not known to perform the ceremony but some wear the sacred thread renewing it yearly in the month of Sravana. The Caukalshis wear the sacred thread during the marriage ceremony but at no other time.

On going through this ceremony the boy becomes a brahmacari (an unwed religious student) and from then one should pursue Vedic study at the feet of his guru for some years, completing which, should undergo the samavartana (return) ceremony. But, as the present custom goes, the samavartana or the sod-munj ceremony as it is called, follows the thread-girding without much lapse of time, the whole ceremony coming to a close within a day.

In order to convey an idea of the rites of upanayana in the days of the grhya sutras the ceremony as contained in the Asv. gr. sutra (which is among the shortest) is set out here in full: “Let him initiate the boy who is decked, whose hair (on the head) is shaved (and arranged), who wears a new garment or an antelope skin if a brahman, ruru skin if a ksatriya, goat’s skin if a vaisya; if they put on garments they should put on dyed ones, reddish-yellow, red and yellow (for a brahmana, ksatriya, vaisya respectively), they should have girdles and staffs (as described above). While the boy takes hold of (the hand of) his teacher, the latter offers (a homa of clarified butter oblations) in the fire (as described above) and seats himself to the north of the fire with his face turned to the east, while the other one (the boy) stations himself in front (of the teacher) with his face turned to the west. The teacher then fills the folded hands of both himself and of the boy with water and with the verse ‘we choose that of Savitr’ (Rg. V. 82.1) the teacher drops down the water in his own folded hands on to the water in the folded hands of the boy; having thus poured the water, he should seize with his own hand the boy’s hand together with the thumb (of the boy) with the formula ‘by the urge (or order) of the god Savitr, with the arms of the two Asvins, with the hands of Pusan, I seize thy hand, oh! so and so; with the words ‘Savitr has seized thy hand, oh so and so’ a second time (the teacher seizes the boy’s hand); with the words ‘Agni is thy teacher oh so and so’ a third time. The teacher should cause (the boy) to look at the sun, while the teacher repeats ‘God Savitr! this is thy brahmacari, protect him, may he not die’ and (the teacher should further) say ‘Whose brahmacari art thou? thou art the brahmacari of Prana. Who does initiate thee and whom (does he initiate?) I give thee to Ka (to Prajapati). With the half verse (Rg. III 8.4.) ‘the young man, well attired and dressed, came hither’ he (the teacher) should cause him to turn round to the right and with his two hands placed over (the boy’s) shoulders he should touch the place of the boy’s heart repeating the latter half (of Rg. III. 8.4). Having wiped the ground round the fire the brahmacri should put (on the fire) a fuel stick silently, since it is known (from sruti) ‘what belongs to Prajapati is silently (done)’, and the brahmacari belongs to Prajapati. Some do this (offering of a fuel stick) with a mantra ‘to Agni I have brought a fuel stick, to the great Jatavedas; by the fuel stick mayst thou increase, Oh Agni and may we (increase) through brahman (prayer or spiritual lore), svaha’. Having put the fuel stick (on the fire) and having touched the fire, he (the student) thrice wipes off his face with the words ‘I anoint myself with lustre.’ ‘May Agni bestow on me, insight, offspring and lustre; on me may Indra bestow insight, offspring and vigour (indriya); on me may the sun bestow insight, offspring and radiance; what thy lustre is, Oh Agni, may I thereby become strong; what thy consuming power is, Oh Agni may I thereby acquire consuming power. Having waited upon (worshipped) Agni with these formulas, (the student) should bend his knees, embrace (the teacher’s feet) and say to him ‘recite, Sir, recite, Sir, the Savitri’. Seizing the student’s hands with the upper garment (of the student) and his own hands the teacher recites the Savitri, first pada by pada, then hemistich by hemistich (and lastly) the whole verse. He (the “teacher) should make him (the student) recite (the Savitri) as much as he is able. On the place of the student’s heart the teacher lays his hand with the fingers upturned; may Brhaspati appoint thee unto me’. Having tied the girdle mind follow my mind; may you attend on my words single minded; may Brhaspati appoint thee unto me’. Having tied the girdle round him (the boy) and having given him the staff, the teacher should instruct him in the observances of a brahmacari with the words ‘a brahmacari art thou, sip water, do service, do not sleep by day, depending (completely) on the teacher learn the Veda’. He (the student) should beg (food) in the evening and the morning; he should put a fuel stick (on fire) in the evening and the morning. That (which he has received by begging) he should announce to the teacher; he should not sit down (but should be standing) the rest of the day.” [P. V. Kane, History of Dharmahastra, Vol. II, Part 1, p. 281.]

Marriage.

Hindus consider vivaha (marriage) as one of the sarirasam-skaras (sacraments sanctifying the body) through each of which every man and woman must pass at the proper age and time, and as such they think it is obligatory on every person to marry. As a sacrament a marriage can be established only after undergoing certain rites and ceremonies, and these marriage rituals, at least among the higher castes are the same as elsewhere with minor variations. The present-day customs and ceremonial practices observed by Hindus regarding marriage fall in three broad classes, viz., (1) The traditional form generally used by professional priests for conducting marriage ceremonies of Brahmans and allied Classes. It is mainly based on rites prescribed in the grhyasutras and in it Vedic mantras are freely used. (2) The pauranika form which is essentially the same as (1) but in it Puranic mantras instead of Vedic ones are used. (3) Modern forms which are variants of (1) and (2) and preached by sponsors of movements of reformism or revivalism among the people [ Following instituted bodies are known to have preached such forms:- (1) Arya Samaj, (2) Prarthana Samaj, (3) Satya Shodhak Samaj, (4) Hindu Dharma Nirnaya Mandal, and (5) Hindu Missionary Society.]. Even when the ceremony is celebrated in the traditional way, the general tendency now-a-days, is towards curtailing ritualistic details to the extent of winding up the ceremony in a day or two thereby aligning it with the modern form.

A marriage alliance is arranged or settled generally by the parents or guardians of the groom and the bride concerned, and as Kanyadana or giving a daughter in marriage is considered meritorious among the higher castes, it is always the bride’s parents or relatives that take the initiative in the match-making. Social conditions, however, among advanced classes have now changed a great deal. Among them a practice of letting the would be couple to go for a walk and be together to know each other is followed. But this is an innovation and not the people’s custom. The custom of consulting and comparing horoscopes of the girl and the boy is gradually falling into disuse, as the parents of the couple hold that considerations of dowry or good looks are more important than the agreement of stars, and settle the marriages according to the pritivivaha or love form in which no consultation of horoscopes is required. Monetary considerations almost invariably dominate a marriage settlement. But regarding it no uniform rule prevails. Some castes put a price on the bride, others on the bridegroom and there are some who do not put a price on either of the two. Generally among higher castes hunda (dowry or property which a woman brings to her husband) is paid by. the bride’s parents to the bridegroom. Among castes not in the first flight the bride’s parents usually take deja (bride-price). It may be noted here that the dowry demanded from the bride’s father is under the guise of vara daksina-money the donee receives from the donor to fulfil the purpose of a dana (gift). In some communities, especially among the middle class educated families of the Kayastha Prabhus in the district, dowry forms a supervening consideration in a marriage settlement. Among high class Marathas marriage is very costly. The bride’s father must give a large dowry to the bridegroom, and in return the bridegroom’s father must present valuable ornaments to the bride. Even the well-to-do gets harassed if he has many daughters. In proportion to the position of the family, the father has to spend on his daughter’s marriage, running into debt from which he seldom frees himself.

Marriage Rules.

According to the orthodox way of life there exist a number of restrictions on a marriage selection. Rules of endogamy (i.e., rules restricting marriage within the group) prohibit marriage outside the caste or sub-caste; rules of exogamy which operate within the endogamous group prohibit marriage between sapindas (blood relations), sagotras and sapravaras (same eponymous groups). Brahmans and allied communities generally claim gotras and pravaras and abide by gotra and pravara exogamy. Non-Brahman communities have kuli (stock), devak (totem) and surnames as exogamous divisions. Maratha families have devaks or sacred symbols, which appear to have been originally totems, and affect marriage to the extent that a man cannot marry a woman whose devak reckoned on the male side is the same as his own. The religious restriction on sapindas is extended to seven degrees on the father’s side and five degrees on the mother’s side, but the prohibited degrees of kindred for marriage beyond the agnates (related on the father’s side) vary according to the custom of the community. Marriages among families of the same gotra are now made permissible under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, but marriages among, sapindas are totally prohibited by law as well as by custom. As regards cross-cousin unions, except that of the brother’s daughter with the sister’s son which is tolerated or even preferred among some castes other types are generally disallowed. Marriage with a wife’s sister is allowed, and brothers may marry girls who are sisters. Polygamy, which was once allowed and practised, is now prohibited by law [Social usage in relation to these marriage rules is being considerably affected by recent legal enactments, namely, (1) the Child Marriage Restraints Act of 1929, as amended by Act XIX of 1938, which prohibits marriage of boys under 18 years of age, and girls under 14 years of age; (2) the Hindu Marriage Disabilities Removal Act (XXVIII of 1946), which validates marriages between parties (a) belonging to the same gotra or pravara or (b) belonging to different sub-divisions of the same caste; and now the extensive alterations made by legislation embodied in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, abrogates and over-rides all the rules of Hindu Law concerning marriage previously applicable to Hindus.].

Wedding.

When primary negotiations are complete the formal ceremonies of vadhu pariksa (inspection of the bride) and sakharpuda (betrothal) are gone through. On an auspicious day a select party on the boy’s side arrange to visit the girl’s house with due notice, and there at a tea-party on interviewing the girl make her a present of an ornament and new cloth (sadi, etc.,) and distribute sweets among the assembled as a mark of their approval. The fathers of the bride and the bridegroom settle the dowry (vara daksina) and the presents (varopacara) to be given to the bridegroom by the bride’s father. These items may be entered into an agreement and its copies marked with kunkum and exchanged between the two fathers. The muhurta auspicious day and hour for the wedding, is then determined. and fixed giving due consideration to the tdrdbala, candrabala (i.e., the happy and powerful influence of the birth-stars) of the wedding couple.

The friends and relations of the bride and the bridegroom now start giving each kelvan (congratulatory) feasts. Lagna-mandaps, marriage pandals, are erected at both the houses. Printed invitation cards or letters are distributed or posted, and a formal invitation ceremony and procession called aksat may take place a day or two before the marriage. Halad, i.e., besmearing the boy and the girl with turmeric powder is considered as an important ceremony among the lpwer castes.

On the marriage day or on the day previous, as a prelude to the vivaha (wedlock) ceremony a number of propitiatory rites are gone through both at the bride’s and the bridegroom’s. Punyahavacana (holy day blessing) which is conjoined with devakasthapana (guardian-enshrining) and in which the boy and his parents (and the girl and her parents at the girl’s house) participate is performed at about seven in the morning. This is followed by nandi-sraddha, an auspicious rite requesting the spirits of the forefathers to be present in the house and bless the wedding, and mandapa-devata pratistha, i.e., establishing the booth-spirits. When the time for marriage draws near, the girl’s father accompanied by his priest goes to the boy’s house, and gives him formal invitation to his house to hold the marriage.

Meanwhile the bride who may be clad in the orthodox fashion in yellow sadi known as astaputri or vadhuvastra and a short sleeved backless bodice, sits before Gaurihar (the marriage god which is an image of Siva and his consort Gauri) in the house, throws a few grains of rice and sesamum over the image, and prays with words, “Gauri, Gauri grant me a happy wifehood and long life to him who is coming to my door.”

In the actual marriage ceremony, there are numerous stages of which, the following are the principal:-(1) Simantapujana, i.e., reception and adoration of the bridegroom at the entrance of the town. (2) Vadhugrha-gamanam, i.e., going to the place of the bride. (3) Madhuparka, i.e., a respectful offering made to a guest or the bride-groom on his arrival at the door of the father of the bride. (4) Parasparaniriksna, i.e., the ceremony of gazing at each other through the screen called antarpat, and of garlanding the bride-groom by the bride. (5) Kanyadana, i.e., the ceremony of giving the girl in marriage. (6) Vivahahoma, i.e., offering of oblation by throwing ghee into the sacred fire in honour of the marriage. (7) Panigrahana, i.e., ceremony of taking by the hand. (8) Lajahoma, i.e., throwing parched grains into the consecrated fire. (9) Saptapadi, i.e., the ceremony of bride and bride-groom walking together seven steps round the sacred fire after which the marriage becomes irrevocable.

The vivahahoma ending in saptapadi is the operative and essential portion of the ceremony. On completion of the last step the actual marriage is considered to be complete. The concluding ceremonies that follow are varat, the homeward return of the bridegroom with the bride in a procession, and grahapravesh, i.e.. the ceremonial home-entering of the newly wed.

Tao of Abundance by Laurence G. Boldt

1 – The Nameless Tao – Wu-ming – Recognizing the unity of all things starts you on the path to true abundance.

2 – Nature – Tzu-jan – Learning to receive opens the door to your greatest good.

3 – Ease – Wu-wei – Following the path of least resistance brings success with ease.

4 – Flow – Ch’i – Circulating the energy in your life strengthens health, deepens relationships, and generates wealth.

5 – Power – Te – Honoring your innate dignity and actualizing your inborn abilities is the road to authentic power.

6 – Harmony – Yin/Yang – Balancing yin and yang eliminates stress and brings peace of mind.

7 – Leisure – Jen – Taking time to be, to grow, and to nurture your relationships gives you the strength to persevere.

8 – Beauty – Li – Achieving your destiny is a matter of trusting and embracing the organic pattern of your life.

12 Great Riches of Life

Positive mental attitude
All riches begin with a state of mind. And remember, it is the one thing over which you have sole control. This is the starting point of all riches, whether they be material or intangible. It attracts true friendship and the hope of future achievement. You labor in the highest plane of your soul, creating. It attracts harmony in home relationships and friendly cooperation. It frees you from fear and provides you with the riches of enthusiasm. It inspires you with the riches of song and laughter, which indicate your state of mind. The joy of knowing that the mind can and will serve any desired end if one will take possession of it and fuel it with a definite purpose. It elicits the riches of play through which one may lay aside all of the burdens of life and become as a little child again. It puts you in touch with one’s “other self” – the self which knows no such reality as permanent failure. The wisdom of meditation through which one may draw upon the great universal supply of infinite intelligence at will. These and all other riches begin with a positive mental attitude.
Sound Physical Health
Sound health begins with a “health consciousness” produced by a mind that thinks in terms of health instead of sickness. It requires temperance in eating and commitment to physical activity.
Harmony in Human Relationships
Harmony with others begins with yourself. “To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou cans’t not then be false to any man” ~Shakespeare
Freedom from Fear
Nobody who fears anything is free. The seven basic fears that appear in the mind are poverty, criticism, ill health, loss of love,loss of liberty, old age, and death.
The Hope of Achievement
The greatest of all forms of happiness comes from hope of achievement of some yet unattained desire.
The Capacity for Faith
Faith is the connection with the conscious mind and all that is. It is the fertile soil of the garden of the human mind where all riches in life are produced. It is the stuff that gives creative power and action to the impulses of your thoughts.
Willingness to Share One’s Blessings
Happiness comes only by sharing. Riches that are not shared will ultimately die. All riches may be multiplied by the simple process of sharing them where they may serve others.
Labor of Love
Labor is the highest form of human expression of desire. The forerunner of all human progress. All labors of love are sanctified because they bring the joy of self-expression.
An Open Mind on All Subjects
It is only the person with an open mind who becomes truly educated and who is thus prepared to receive the greater riches of life.
Self-Discipline
The person who cannot master himself may never become of the master of anything else. Those that master themselves become the masters of their destiny. The greatest expression of this is in humility of the hear when one has attained great riches or has been overtaken by that which is called “success”.
Capacity to Understand People
Comes from the basic understanding that all people are fundamentally like and evolved from the same place. Those who understand what motivates others must first understand what motivates themselves.
Economic Security
Economic security is not attained by the possession of money alone. It is attained by the service one renders – for this may be converted into all forms of human needs, with or without the use of money.

14 Secrets to Success by Napoleon Hill

These 14 Secrets to Success are taken from a new updated version of the classic book The Magic Ladder to Success, in answer to the question “will you show us how to secure the confidence of the public in our work…?”

I render more service than I ask people to pay for.
I engage in no transaction, intentionally, that does not benefit all whom it affects.
I make no statements that I do not believe to be true.
I have sincere desire in my heart to be of useful service to the greatest possible number of people.
I like people better than money.
I am doing my best to live as well as to teach my own philosophy of success.
I accept no favors from anyone without giving favors in return.
I ask nothing of any person without having a right to that for which I ask.
I enter into no arguments with people over trivial matters.
I spread the sunshine of optimism and good cheer wherever and whenever I can.
I never flatter people for the purpose of gaining their confidence.
I sell counsel and advice to other people, at a modest price, but never offer free advice.
While teaching others how to achieve success, I have demonstrated that I can make my philosophy work for myself as well, thus “practicing what I preach.”
I am so thoroughly sold on the work in which I am engaged that my enthusiasm over it becomes contagious and others are influenced by it.

10 Major Factors for Confidence by Napoleon Hill

10 Major Factors for Confidence by Napoleon Hill
(pgs. 131-132: How to Sell Your Way Through Life, 1955, Ralston Publishing Co., Cleveland, Ohio.)
By careful observation of thousands of sales people from whom I have learned all that I know about selling, I discovered that ten major factors enter into the development of confidence. They are:
(1) Follow the habit of rendering more service and better service than you are paid to render.
(2) Enter into no transaction which does not benefit, as nearly alike as possible, everyone it affects.
(3) Make no statement which you do not believe to be true, no matter what temporary advantages a falsehood might seem to offer.
(4) Have a sincere desire in your heart to be of the greatest possible service to the largest number of people.
(5) Cultivate a wholesome admiration for people; like them better than you like money!
(6) Do you best to live as well as preach your own philosophy of business. Actions speak louder than words!
(7) Accept no favors, large or small, without giving favors in return.
(8) Ask nothing of any person without believing that you have a right to that for which you ask.
(9) Enter into no arguments with any person over trivial or non-essential details.
(10)Spread the sunshine of good cheer wherever and whenever you can. No man trusts a joy-killer!

5 Irrefutable, Non-Negotiable Laws of Leadership

Leaders, new and old, sometimes lose sight of the most fundamental tenets of leadership. Here’s a reminder… I frequently tell executives that leadership and its concepts, theories and core applications haven’t changed in a millennium.
Some of our demographics may have changed. This forces us to use alternative applications of those concepts. But the basic leadership concepts and theories remain.
So, why don’t we “just do it?”
Sometimes we aren’t motivated. Sometimes the “time” just doesn’t seem right. Maybe we simply forgot some of the basics… hence this article.
When I train companies and corporations worldwide on how to improve management and organization performance, I start off with these 5 laws new and experienced leaders should never ever forget.
Kevin’s Leadership Skills Training Survival Kit for New & Experienced Managers
Leadership Law #1: Never delay a decision that must be made.
Make your decision and move on. You may have to immediately make another decision. This doesn’t mean your first one was wrong. It merely means that your second one had the benefit of additional knowledge.
Leadership Law #2: When you want something specific done, say so specifically, using clear, plain language.
Employees generally have some difficulty doing their basic jobs. By adding “mind-reading” to their description is just plain unfair.
Do not use hints, implications, or innuendos. Say what you want, and use plain English! Directness counts.
Leadership Law #3: Never answer every employee’s every question.
Questions are teaching moments — don’t rob employees of the opportunity. But don’t spend your whole time answering questions.
When you always answer every employee’s every question, you’ll forever be answering your employee’s every question. This will leave you with no time to spend on areas that need your direct attention now.
Sounds trite, and I don’t mean it to.
If employees are asking because they’re stupid, get rid of them. If they are decent employees asking because they do not know, then teach them. They’ll know next time, and you’ll both be better for it.
Leadership Law #4: Make your expectations clear, then back up a bit and give employees room to do their job.
That doesn’t mean to never look back. To inspect what you expect isn’t micromanagement. It’s good management.
Even your top performers need clear expectations. Give them a target. Provide resources and guidance. Remove obstacles when necessary. Then let them do their job. But, don’t forget to check back later, since you still have management responsibilities.
Leadership Law #5: Employees need their managers to be leaders
Your employees don’t need a shoulder. They don’t need a buddy, a sympatico, or a commiserator. If you want a friend, buy a dog.
We all struggle with this. Everyone wants to be liked, and it always seems difficult to decline a beer after work, or something similar. I’m not advocating a monk-like existence, disallowing any contact with your troops. I’m just merely reminding you that they would like to have a friend, but they need a leader if they are to be successful.
You do want them to be successful, don’t you?
Closing Leadership Thoughts
These leadership laws are fairly intuitive, and certainly not rocket science or brain surgery. They are simple management and leadership truths that have passed the test of time.
Print these out. Laminate it. Put in your top desk drawer and don’t forget them.
About Kevin Berchelmann- visit http://www.triangleperformance.com
Described as a Human Capital Expert by The Harvard Business Press, helps companies foster, motivate, and improve existing human capital to achieve breakthrough levels

Keys to Leadership

1.The leader leads. He exercises critical judgment, which will have a great impact on his people.
2.The leader defines the company. The leader’s responsibility is to explicitly present and advocate the company’s purposes and goals.
3.The leader inspires. He gives sense and meaning to the job. He makes his people realize, that beyond profit there is an underlying meaning, value, and deeper reason for the work they do.
4.The leader should be the evangelist. He should be able to exercise his influence, to sell the values of ethical conduct.
5.The leader must see the company as a coherent whole. He should be aware of the diversity in the company and bring this together to promote the whole.
6.The leader must know that there is no better way to create a family in the workplace than to encourage the family at home. Harman International introduced the anti-domestic violence program in the company, which reinforces the idea that the company cares.
7.The leader should never underestimate the value of disciplined hard work.
8.The leader empowers subordinates to do their jobs. He should institute programs for the guidance and training of his people. He should always keep the lines of communication open.
9.The leader promotes closure. He should know the right time to get things done.
10.The leader knows what he doesn’t know. The leader is not afraid to ask clarifications, if he does not understand a particular subject.
11.The leader knows the meaning of two minutes. He should respect the time of others and that of his own.
12.The leader teaches.
13.
14.Above all, the leader develops others. As Lao Tzu advanced: “the leader having accomplished great things, the people all feel they did it themselves…”
15.The very best leaders go beyond the mere setting of example. He should be able to cause a leap of imagination and faith in his people.
16.The leader recognizes that people are often at their very best the moment they have been let go. There are times when an employee doesn’t like the work anymore, or he is unable to appreciate how the whole enterprise works- this is the time to set him free

From
Mind Your Own Business A Maverick’s Guide to Business, Leadership and Life By Sidney Harman

How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci , Seven Steps to followed Everyday by the Genius

The Seven da Vincian Principles.

1. Curiosita:
an insatiably curious approach and an unrelenting quest for continuous learning.
2. Dimostrazione:
A commitment to test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes.
3. Sensazione:
The continual refinement of the senses, especially sight as the means to enliven experience.
4. Sfumato:
A willingness to embrace ambiguity, paradox and uncertainty.
5. Arte/Scienza:
Whole brain thinking. The development of the balance between science and art, logic and imagination.
6. Corporalita:
The cultivation of grace, ambidexterity, fitness and poise.
7. Connessione:
A recognition of and appreciation for the interconnectedness of all things and phenomena.

The Laws of Motivation

Law 1 We have to be Motivated to Motivate
Law 2 Motivation Requires a Goal
Law 3 Motivation, Once Established, Never Lasts
Law 4 Motivation Requires Recognition
Law 5 Participation Motivates
Law 6 Seeing Ourselves Progressing Motivates Us
Law 7 Challenge Only Motivates If You Can Win
Law 8 Everybody Has a Motivational Fuse
Law 9 Group Belonging Motivates

Embrace your team mates and win as the team

1.People try to achieve great things by themselves mainly because of the size of their ego
2.Members must be willing to subordinate their roles and personal agendas to support the team vision.
3.Essentially, when the right team member is in the right place, everyone benefits
4.Focus on the team and the dream should take care of itself. The type of challenge determines the type of team you require
5.The strength of the team is impacted by its weakest link.
6.Winning teams have players who make things happen
7.A team should examine its Moral, Intuitive, Historical, Directional, Strategic, and Visionary Compasses
8.Rotten attitudes ruin a team Do you keep score when it comes to the praise and perks handed out to other team members?
9.Do you perform your work with excellence? Are you dedicated to the team’s success? Can people depend on you?
10.The team fails to reach its potential when it fails to pay the price.
11.The scoreboard is essential to evaluating performance at any given time, and is vital to decision-making
12.Any team that wants to excel must have good substitutes as well as starters.
13.The type of values you choose for the team will attract the type of members you need. Values give the team a unique identity to its members
14.From leader to teammates, teammates to leader, and among teammates, there should be consistency, clarity and courtesy in Communication
15.A good leader can bring a team to success, provided values, work ethic and vision are in place.The person with greater skill, experience, and productivity in a given area is more important to the team in that area
16.When a team has high morale, it can deal with whatever circumstances are thrown at it.
17.Gather the best team possible, pay the price to develop the team, do things together, delegate responsibility and authority, and give credit for success.

From
Indisputable Laws of Teamwork by John C. Maxwell,

What The World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently

Key Ideas:
1. The best managers reject conventional wisdom.
2. The best managers treat every employee as an individual.
3. The best managers never try to fix weaknesses; instead they focus on strengths and talent.
4. The best managers know they are on stage everyday. They know their people are watching every move they make.
5. Measuring employee satisfaction is vital information for your investors.
6. People leave their immediate managers, not the companies they work for.
7. The best managers are those that build a work environment where the employees answer positively to these 12 Questions:

a. Do I know what is expected of me at work?
b. Do I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right?
c. At work, do I have the opportunity to do what I do best everyday?
d. In the last seven days, have I received recognition or praise for doing good work?
e. Does my supervisor or someone at work seem to care about me as a person?
f. Is there someone at work who encourages my development?
g. At work, do my opinions seem to count?
h. Does the mission/purpose of my company make me feel my job is important?
i. Are my co-workers committed to doing quality work?
j. Do I have a best friend at work?
k. In the last six months, has someone at work talked to me about my progress?
l. This last year, have I had the opportunity at work to learn and grow?

Some More wisdom in a nutshell1. Know what can be taught, and what requires a natural talent.
2. Set the right outcomes, not steps. Standardize the end but not the means. As long as the means are within the company’s legal boundaries and industry standards,et the employee use his own style to deliver the result or outcome you want.
3. Motivate by focusing on strengths, not weaknesses.
4. Casting is important, if an employee is not performing at excellence, maybe she is not cast in the right role.
5. Every role is noble, respect it enough to hire for talent to match.
6. A manager must excel in the art of the interview. See if the candidate’s recurring patterns of behavior match the role he is to fulfill. Ask open-ended questions and let him talk. Listen for specifics.
7. Find ways to measure, count, and reward outcomes.
8. Spend time with your best people. Give constant feedback. If you can’t spend an hour every quarter talking to an employee, then you shouldn’t be a manager.
9. There are many ways of alleviating a problem or non-talent. Devise a support system, find a complementary partner for him, or an alternative role.
10. Do not promote someone until he reaches his level of incompetence; simply offer bigger rewards within the same range of his work. It is better to have an excellent highly paid waitress or bartender on your team than promote him or her to a poor starting-level bar manager.
11. Some homework to do: Study the best managers in the company and revise training to incorporate what they know

Extracted From
First, Break All The Rules By Marcus Buckingham & Curt Coffman Simon & Schuster

FRONTLINE COVER STORY Lesser citizens RANJEET KUMAR

COVER STORY Lesser citizens RANJEET KUMAR Volume 23 – Issue 24 :: Dec. 02-15, 2006
In every State Muslims constitute disadvantaged communities; only the extent and nature of the disadvantage vary.

MUNICIPAL CORPORATION SWEEPERS M.D. Jaleel and Ganesh Ram sit before their houses at Ambedkar Colony in Patna.
OUTCASTS Venkitesh Ramakrishnan in Patna

TO the residents of Yarpur basti (an urban settlement) in the heart of Patna, there is nothing extraordinary in the friendship between Mohammed Jaleel and Ganesh Ram Bara. Both of them, in their mid-sixties, had worked together for many decades in the Patna Municipal Corporation as sanitation workers. They spent much of their lives in Yarpur, locally called dom basti or bhangi basti in a disparaging reference to the caste of the sanitation workers. Their work involved a variety of tasks, such as sweeping the roads, unclogging gutters, cleaning toilets, carrying filth and disposing of waste, aimed at keeping Bihar’s capital city clean. Because of the nature of their job both Jaleel and Bara faced the same kind of societal exclusion.

“No Brahmin or Rajput would come to my house or drink a glass of water from my hands. No Pathan or Sayed or Mallik would go to Jaleel’s house or have a glass of water from his hands,” says Bara. “All our social gatherings are essentially among sanitation workers, both Hindu and Muslim,” Jaleel says.

Obviously, Jaleel and Bara have led strikingly similar lives. Their day-to-day social experiences too are similar. Yet, in the eyes of the government, Jaleel is more privileged than Bara. Throughout his service, Bara had enjoyed some benefits because the Hindu safai karmachari community was absorbed in the Scheduled Castes (S.C.) list. Jaleel never got the same benefit because he is a Muslim. “We tried to enlist ourselves as beneficiaries of various government schemes, including education schemes, which our Hindu brethren enjoy, but we were rejected each time on the grounds that we were Muslims,” Jaleel’s daughter, Najma Khatun, told Frontline.

But this is not the story of one Jaleel and his family. Dalit Muslims across Bihar and other parts of North India who belong to castes such as Jolaha, Nutt, Bakkho, Bhatiyara, Kunjra, Dhunia, Kalal, Dafali, Dhobi, Lalbegi, Gorkan, Meershikar, Cheek and Rangrez, have the same low social ranking and are deprived of the benefit others enjoy. In many parts of North India, many of these communities have separate mosques and bury their dead in separate graveyards.

According to Mohammed Usman Halal Khor, general secretary of the All India Pasmanda Muslim Mahaj (AIPMM), a Bihar-based organisation of Dalits and Most Backward Caste (MBC) Muslims, the socially and educationally backward communities among Muslims “are not accepted or treated as equals by elite Muslim communities and even by sections of the clergy. They are subject to the same social discrimination faced by Dalit Hindus. Yet, Dalit Muslims are deemed ineligible for the government benefits given to Dalit Hindus.”

A significant aspect of Justice Rajendra Sachar Committee’s report on the status of Indian Muslims is that it has highlighted the plight of Dalit Muslims. According to Ali Anwar, president of the AIPMM and a Janata Dal (United) Rajya Sabha member, the report clearly underscores the need for evolving special programmes to uplift the various Dalit Muslim communities from social and educational backwardness. “If at all reservation in jobs and educational institutions [for Muslims] are introduced on account of the Sachar Committee report, it is these [Dalit] communities that deserve it and not the Muslim elite,” he said. A major demand made by the AIPMM before the Sachar Committee was for a census based on caste to evaluate the social and educational backwardness among different religious groups. The AIPMM has demanded S.C. status for Dalit Muslims.

Although the Sachar Committee report has suggested that it would be appropriate to include low-caste Muslims, mostly working as butchers, barbers and scavengers, in the S.C. list or in a separate category, its actual implementation would prove difficult. To start with, there is considerable opposition from some prominent S.C. leaders and organisations to the inclusion of Dalit Muslims in the S.C. category.

Former Union Minister and Congress leader Yogendra Makwana told Frontline that mere study reports were not enough to include new communities in the S.C. list. “Caste-based analysis stopped with the 1931 round table meet of Census Commissioners and as of now we have no system to make new evaluations of castes and their social and educational backwardness. Moreover, Dalits who converted to Islam or Christianity no longer suffer from untouchability, which is the primary consideration for according S.C. status to any social group,” he said.

According to P.S. Krishnan, former Secretary to the Government of India and one of the foremost authorities on the condition of socially and educationally backward communities, the demand for including certain Dalit Muslims in the S.C. category indeed needs to be considered but only after a thorough anthropological study. He pointed out that the social effect created by conversion to Islam from Dalit and Backward Caste communities were dissimilar in different parts of the country. “Studies have shown that a significant number of the Dalit communities who converted to Islam in South India have registered a distinct rise in social scale, while the same cannot be said of those in North India. The communities that have acquired better social mobility by conversion and those that have failed to do so need to be identified and categorised so that new initiatives of affirmative action can be taken,” he added.

A number of social activists working among Dalit communities pointed out that a hidden reason for the opposition from S.C. leaders and organisations to include Dalit Muslims in the S.C. category is the fear of losing the opportunities currently available. “Inclusion of Dalit Muslims in the S.C. category would naturally lead to the inclusion of Dalit Christians too, and there is a perception that Dalit Christians as a whole have access to better educational facilities than other Dalit communities. Consequently, there is also a fear that Dalit Christians would get the best of positions in any competition under the S.C. quota,” an activist based in Uttar Pradesh, another State with a large Dalit Muslim population, said.

Another argument proffered against including Dalit Muslim in the S.C. category is that the majority of them are already part of the OBC or MBC list in various States. According to informal estimates, 75 to 80 per cent of Muslims across the country are in the OBC or MBC list, and hence it is argued that there is no need to include them in the S.C. category. But, evidently, such rationalisation would not stand the test of objective social and legal scrutiny because fundamentally there can be no justification for including a person with the social and educational status of an S.C. in the OBC or MBC category. Dalit Muslims have been categorised along with the dominant OBC castes at the Central level and in States such as Uttar Pradesh. “It is because of this situation that we are demanding a revision of the present OBC and MBC list,” said Mohammed Usman.

According to the AIPMM, globalisation and economic liberalisation is inflicting hardships on Dalit Muslim groups, known as arzals, mostly working as weavers, artisans, carpet-makers, cultivators, tailors, washermen and butchers. “Opportunities for these communities are becoming more and more limited in the emerging situation,” Ali Anwar said. The AIPMM leader wants all States to take a positive look at the Bihar Legislature’s initiative of 2000, recommending reservation for Dalit Muslims.

Anwar does not blame the governments and their agencies for being ignorant of the plight of Dalit Muslims. In his book Masawat Ki Jung, Anwar has held that the Muslim ulemmas, have failed to initiate moves to improve the social and economic lot of Dalit Muslims.

PUSHED TO CRIME
Anupama Katakam in Mumbai

VIVEK BENDRE

MEMBERS OF THE Patriotic Front of India protest against what they describe as the Maharashtra government’s atrocities against the minority community after the Mumbai and Malegaon bomb blasts.

SHABNAM SHEIKH knew it was only a matter of time before she received that dreaded knock at midnight. It happened in June 2004. The police arrived at her doorstep at 1 a.m. and told her that her son Mohammed Ahmed Sheikh, 21, was under arrest in connection with a money-laundering racket.

Shabnam was helpless. She had no means to fight her son’s case. Her husband was killed and their house was burnt during the 1992-93 Mumbai riots. She worked as a domestic help and managed to educate her son and two daughters. In spite of qualifying in basic computer usage, her son was unable to land a job.

Living in one of Mumbai’s many ghettoes, which are quite often domains of underworld gangs, young Mohammed got involved in petty crime and gang work. Shabnam says he was angry, disillusioned and frustrated with the discrimination and lack of opportunities for youth like him. “He saw his father’s burnt body at a young age. He could have become like so many other boys of the basti who turned to crime at a very young age.” The trip to jail to see her son is valuable time off, but she makes it because she feels her son is a good boy who just did not get a chance to do honest work.

Shabnam Sheikh’s faith in her son may easily be dismissed as a mother’s devotion to her offspring. But her story is no different from thousands of other such disillusioned Muslims in Maharashtra.

VIVEK BENDRE
IN BEHRAMPADA, ONE of the many Muslim localities in Mumbai.

A police officer said the majority of the people who visited the Arthur Road jail daily were burqa-clad. There are several hundreds of men like Mohammed who are awaiting trial. Since they do not have access to good lawyers many of them languish in jail for years. Torture and other forms of human rights violations to extract information and confessions are part of their miserable existence.

The Justice Rajinder Sachar Committee report points out that Muslims, who account for 10.6 per cent of the population of Maharashtra, constitute 32.4 per cent of the total number of prisoners in the State. Muslims also comprise 40.6 per cent of prisoners in the State who have been in prison for less than a year. The disproportion in numbers is disconcerting, says a senior State police officer.

Criminal activities could mean anything from regular robberies to underworld operations such as counterfeiting, extortion and drug peddling. Ever since 1993 and owing to the more recent terror attacks, terrorism is a big battle the State has been fighting. “Whatever the crime the disturbing fact is that Muslims are the majority perpetrators in every type of crime. We need to understand why this is happening,” says the officer.

Unlike other States, says the officer, Maharashtra has Mumbai. “It is like a crime capital. So the numbers will be high.” The megapolis has a history of underworld operations and, more recently, anti-national activities. As per the National Crime Records Bureau, 2005, Mumbai accounted for 10 per cent of the total crimes reported from 35 mega cities in the country. Mumbai has attracted Muslim immigrants from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar for decades. This adds to the numbers, says the officer.

Although there are several socio-economic reasons for the disturbing statistics, human rights activists and representatives of the Muslim community say that investigating agencies armed with their biases and draconian laws have been largely responsible for the increasing number of arrests of members of this community.

For instance, post-1993 serial blasts more than 200 people – mainly Muslims – were arrested under the Terrorist and Disruptive Activities (Prevention) Act. The trial, which is in its final stages, has led to the conviction of close to 100 of the 138 accused. TADA lapsed in 1995 to give place to the Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA), which was repealed in 2004. Police records put the total number of persons arrested under POTA at 69. All bearing Muslim names. Human rights organisations, however, say that thousands of innocent people were persecuted under this law.

The problem with POTA is that suspects can be kept in custody for a period of 180 days without being charged, and custodial confessions are admissible in court. The Maharashtra Control of Organised Crime Act, 1999, is a current weapon using which the police can make arbitrary arrests. All three laws have been blatantly misused, these groups say.

A typical case of misuse of POTA is that of a group of boys arrested from Padgah village near Mumbai for planting a bomb in Mulund in 2003. One of the boys, Atif Mulla spent 33 months in jail before he was acquitted. “Every time there is a terror attack, the police pick up our boys,” says local resident Nasir Mulla. The reason Padgah is targeted is because Saquib Nachen, general secretary of the banned Student Islamic Movement of India (SIMI), belongs to this village. “At one time almost 300 people from our village were charged with something or the other,” says Mulla.

Ambujwadi, a slum in Mumbai, provides another example of persecution. Following the July 11 train blasts, 350 people were picked up for suspected involvement in the crime. Ambujwadi is one of those wretched places in the city with no electricity or water. Allegations that it is a haven of criminal activities are met with this response by residents: “Muslims are poor and make easy targets.”

A senior police official argues that there are “absolutely no biases” within the force. That is far from the truth, says Ram Punyani, an activist working on communal issues. At a workshop conducted for lower-ranking policemen, Punyani said it was found that all of them read Saamna (a daily published by the Shiv Sena, a fundamentalist political party). One of the policemen said, “If they can eat the cow, they can do anything.”

Furthermore, there is a strong feeling of alienation within the community, says Punyani. “The police were so quick in arresting people after blasts, but no such speed was shown in arresting people after the riots.” More recently, the government swept under the carpet the case of bombs found in a Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh worker’s house in Nanded. But the police are quick to pick up Muslim youth after any bomb blast.

In fact, in Muslim-dominated Behrampada in Mumbai, youth who had helped carry victims of the train blasts were later hauled off to the police station during a combing operation. “Will these youth not be angry? And if it happens over and over again, they will want justice. If they don’t get it through the normal route, they will look for others ways,” said a local leader.

While there is no justification for the crimes committed, the reason why so many from this minority community add up to the crime statistics has to be analysed, says noted Muslim scholar Asghar Ali Engineer. “Muslims are pushed to these extreme situations. The system has never absorbed them. There are no government jobs, no police jobs and due to blatant discrimination, nothing in the private sector. Poverty in the community is only on the rise.”

“Eventually you and your family have to eat. In a city like Mumbai, which has many illegal activities, it is not difficult to get in to something anti-social,” says Engineer. Besides being discriminated against for their entire lives, many men have been victims of communal violence. Much of the anger and frustration stems from witnessing horrific violence on one’s own family or community. Taking advantage of this, terror agencies or even the underworld brainwash the men by showing video clippings of heinous acts committed on the community. They are then initiated into their world. Since there is money as well, this option works, says Engineer.

The case of Mohammed Aamir, who was caught transporting a huge cache of arms near Aurangabad earlier this year, is a typical example of a poor unemployed man entering the world of crime. Aamir, a school dropout, used to run a foodstall, which had to shut down owing to the bird flu epidemic. Like hundreds of other Muslim boys, he was a member of SIMI. In recent years he was a regular at the meetings of a socio-religious organisation. These organisations apparently provide a lot of support. The police believe these groups are hotbeds of recruitment to jehadi groups.

A maulana in Aurangabad says since Muslims find themselves marginalised in education and in socio-economic areas, a parallel set-up now exists in most of the Muslim ghettoes in cities and towns. For instance, in Aurangabad, he says, you will find organisations such as the Markhez-e-Majlishe-e-Shoora, which deals with divorce issues, and the Darsh-e-Chikha, whicht deals with family and property issues. Similarly, in Behrampada, at every corner there is a “social work” organisation. Nobody is quite sure what they do. But the impression is that the community has little faith in mainstream law and so has decided to settle matters among themselves. Another clear indication of the increasing alienation.

Gujarat Ghettoes
Dionne Bunsha in Ahmedabad and Sabarkantha

“ALL Gujarat’s garbage arrives here,” says Noorbanu Sayyed. “No one will come to live here. There’s nothing but mountains of garbage.” Yet Noorbanu has made this her home, a small 10×10 feet room on the edge of mounds of burning trash in a no-man’s land in Ahmedabad city.

THE TINY HOUSES of Citizen Nagar at the edge of Ahmedabad’s garbage dump. Muslim families sought safety in this isolated, polluted place.

To get to Noorbanu’s house you have to drive through a dusty trail lined with small industrial units and scrap yards. At the far end of the plot, just before the dumping yard begins, is a row of houses. This is `Citizen Nagar’. Ironically, its residents are not treated like citizens.

“There’s no municipal water supply, no drainage, no street lights. Nothing but junk. The water from the borewell is polluted. People get stomach ache and have kidney stones. The gutters are choked,” says Noorbanu. There are no municipal services, but yet, the residents have been slapped with house tax. It is more than a half-hour walk to the nearest private school or dispensary. When it rains, the place gets flooded and it is difficult to get out.

So why would anyone live here? “We had no choice. Since our homes in Naroda Patiya were burned in the riots, we are too scared to go back there. The relief committee gave us a house here, so we stayed. At least it is safe. No one will come here to attack,” she says.

Riot victims are not the only ones moving in here. Several new row houses are under construction. It is a ghetto in the making. Until now, Ahmedabad’s big Muslim ghettos were in Shah Alam and Juhapura, on the city’s outskirts. Now, new ghettos like Citizen Nagar have emerged.

“Muslims are moving in because there is no fear here. There is no `border’ nearby so there is no chance of any fights breaking out or of curfew,” says Mehmood Pathan, a builder who is constructing the row houses. “Most people buying houses here are those chased away from their villages or those living in border areas or families who want bigger houses in a cheap area.”

Most Muslim localities, whether old or new, are deprived of civic facilities. “I have been living at Millat Nagar in Maninagar, Chief Minister Narendra Modi’s constituency, since 1969. We have been paying municipal tax for decades, but do not have even the basic facilities like water or drainage. No politician bothers to visit this place. They tell us they do not need Muslim votes,” Mehmood Pathan said.

The process of segregation in Ahmedabad started after the 1969 riots. Every subsequent riot, particularly those in the 1980s, further divided the city on communal lines. After the 2002 carnage, polarisation has been complete in big cities. “Muslims are too scared to live in Hindu-dominated areas. And even if they want to, no one will sell a house to them,” Pathan explains. The segregation has spread to small towns. Refugees who faced social boycotts in their villages have settled at the edge of nearby towns; living life in limbo, wondering about the condition of their houses and farmland back home, but too scared to return.

In Modasa, a small town in Sabarkantha district, relief committees have built five small settlements providing housing for 550-odd families from 60 villages. Here too, the refugees pay taxes but do not get basic amenities. “We pay Rs.30 a month to a local contractor for water. We are 12 people crammed in this tiny room. If a guest comes visiting, there is no place to make him or her sit,” Najmaben Lohar said.

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE, AHMEDABAD

A BOARD IN Ahmedabad saying “Jai Shree Ram, Jai Somnath, Jai Hindu Rashtra. Vishwa Hindu Parishad and Bajrang Dal welcomes you to Hindu Rashtra’s Naroda region. Proudly say we are Hindus”.

“Last year, I tried to go back to my home in Vada village. But some people there told me, `you ran away. Why do you come back? We will burn your house again’. So I had to return,” Mumtazben Sheikh, a widow, said. “There are no gutters, no place to wash clothes, so fights break out often. But at least we are safe.”

It is shocking to find some people still living in tents, just as in the relief camp four years ago. They are waiting for their houses to be built. “There is no electric light. We light the lamps at night,” says Mehdi Husain Vanjara from Kau-Amlai village. “My three daughters wash dishes and earn Rs.200 each a month. That is how we survive.”

“As the nearest school is located far, half the children have dropped out of school. The dirt road was flooded during the monsoon and two children drowned when they were returning from school,” Mohammed Yusuf Tadha, a relief organiser, said. A team from the National Minority Commission visited Modasa to study the plight of the `internally displaced’. Across Gujarat there are 47 rehabilitation sites where around 5,000 families have sought refuge. These families are living in the most pathetic conditions.

Recently, the Central government announced a compensation of Rs.7 lakhs for each of the 5,000-odd families affected by the post-Godhra riots. While it is badly needed for their survival, compensation will not bridge the divide. And, it is not only those who lost their homes that are affected. In a State that is considered the Sangh Parivar’s `Hindutva laboratory’, every Muslim is affected by the hate culture. Every Muslim faces prejudice every day.

Modasa town itself is divided along communal lines. “Modasa’s population is 45 per cent Muslim, and a market road divides the two sides. Hindus and Muslims have good personal relations but we have separate schools and banks. The college, run by a Hindu trust, is in a Muslim area, but has never faced any threat. At one time it had a Muslim principal, but over the years they have stopped employing Muslims,” Mehmood Pathan said.

Religious organisations are trying to fill the development void in the Muslim areas. “Madrassas have become more academically oriented. The dariwalas [bearded orthodox] want to build proper schools and hospitals. But with this slow segregation, we may have no common institutions,” says Pathan.

“We cannot live together. We have to live separately,” says Harshad Joshi, a retired insurance officer in Modasa who lives in the `border area’. “We are all friends but because of different religions and cultures, we have to live apart. I would be safe living in a Muslim area, but who would my wife talk to? Which temple would she go to? If I try to sell my house to a Muslim, my neighbour will stop me because the price of his house will go down.”

In Ahmedabad too, there are very few buildings outside the ghetto where even well-off Muslims can find accommodation. Over the years, judges, police officers, laywers and doctors have had to move to the ghetto in Juhapura, often unwillingly. “Hindus have a choice. We have no choice. No one will sell property to us. We have been pushed to a corner,” said Sophia Khan, a women’s activist.

Until 2002, Sophia had her office in Navrangpura, a middle-class Hindu area and her home in Shahpur, a mixed area. “My house was attacked but we were saved. After the violence, people in the office building became hostile and asked us to move out in two days. That is when I was forced to move both home and office to Juhapura,” says Sophia. “Even earlier, I was always warned not to reveal my identity. My broker made me put the name of a Hindu trustee of my organisation on the lease agreement.”

Although Juhapura has a population of over three lakhs, it is still viewed as a `dangerous’, `illegal’ `mini-Pakistan’. Even though there are so many big buildings and several high-profile residents, the government has not provided even basic services, not even electricity. Two months ago, Juhapura was brought within the city limits. Until then, it was governed by a panchayat.

“My office is on the main road, but I can’t get a BSNL phone or a broadband connection. There’s no bank or public dispensary. No State transport bus passes through here because it’s considered `dangerous’. We can’t get a loan because it is demarcated a negative zone,” says Sophia. “When we moved to Juhapura, one of my Hindu staff members quit because her family would not allow her to travel here. Without reason, the prejudice keeps getting perpetuated.” There is not a single government school in the area. “People have no choice but to send their children to Muslim-run schools. If people are left to fend for themselves, they have no option but to go to these religious trusts,” she explains.

Economically too, Muslims have been sidelined. “My business has collapsed. It is only 10 per cent of what it once was,” says a builder. “After 2002, we are not sold land anywhere except in Muslim areas. The Disturbed Areas Act, a law framed to curb ghettoisation after riots, is now being misused to prevent Muslims from buying land outside the ghettos.

“Several professionals have already left the State, now businessmen are also trying to wind up and move. The hate culture that has pervaded leaves us with no choice. They want to get us out,” the builder said. “My grandchildren’s classmates tell them to go back to Pakistan.”

All over Gujarat you are constantly reminded that you are in Hindutuva country. The Vishwa Hindu Parishad has put up boards in every neighbourhood which reads: “Welcome to the Hindu Rashtra”. But not many are welcome.

INSECURE
By Sushanta Talukdar in Guwahati

RITU RAJ KONWAR

AT A SESSION of the Jamiat Ulema in Guwahati on April 3, 2005. Until the problem of illegal immigration is solved, Bengali-speaking Muslim settlers will remain unable to address their socio-economic deprivation.

UNLIKE other States in India, the Muslim population in Assam is not homogeneous. The community is divided into different categories based on the history of migration and settlement: indigenous Assamese-speaking Muslims whose forefathers came as Mughal warriors and settled in different parts of the State, Indigenous Bengali-speaking Muslims from East Bengal who settled in Assam during pre-Partition days, Bengali-speaking Muslims who migrated from erstwhile East Pakistan in different streams, and Bengali-speaking illegal migrants from Bangladesh after its creation in 1971 who crossed over through the porous India-Bangladesh border.

The problems for Muslims in the State are rooted in the different historical backgrounds of their settlement and migration and are thus complex. Although Assamese-speaking Muslims can be distinguished culturally and linguistically from other Muslims, it is difficult, on the face of it to make out differences between the other groups.

It was not until the 1920s that the immigration of Bengali-speaking Muslims from Mymansingh district of erstwhile East Bengal and their settlement on Chars (a highly fertile sand isle formed by alluvial silt deposition) of the Brahmaputra was perceived as a threat to Assamese identity. Until that point Assamese leaders and local landlords had benefited from the cheap labour of these settlers. However, their apprehension grew when the Bengali-speaking Muslim population recorded a sharp growth during 1921-31 and 1931-41. Assamese leaders soon started voicing the opinion that unchecked migration might threaten the existence of the Assamese people. This resulted in communal violence in the old undivided Goalpara district and other parts on the northern bank of the Brahmaputra in 1950, during which a large number of Muslim settlers fled for safety to erstwhile East Pakistan.

The leaders of the Bengali-speaking immigrant settlers, however, devised a new strategy: they reported Assamese as their mother tongue in the Census and they pursued their education in the Assamese medium. This pleased Assamese leaders because their community earned the majority status, but it could not remove the “foreigner” label from the immigrant settlers.

The issue of detection and deportation of foreigners, which dominates Assam’s minority politics, today has been part of the State’s politics since the early 1960s. At that time an aggressive campaign was launched by the then Assam Chief Minister Bimala Prasad Chaliha, who was heading a Congress government, to deport all those who had come to Assam since January 1, 1951. The stay of pre-1951 immigrant settlers from erstwhile East Pakistan was validated by the Nehru-Liaquat Pact of April 1950. The Chaliha government deported more than two lakh immigrant settlers to erstwhile East Pakistan under the Prevention of Infiltration from Pakistan (PIP) scheme. It is alleged that immigrant settlers were picked up by the police irrespective of whether they were pre-1951 or post-1951 migrants, taken to the border and pushed across into East Pakistan. However, since the border was open and unmanned the majority of them returned to Assam.

Assam witnessed some of the worst communal violence in 1983 when over 1,800 men, women and children were massacred on a single night in Nellie in the present Morigaon district in an anti-foreigners agitation spearheaded by the All Assam Students’ Union (AASU). Blood was shed despite the fact that many Muslims belonged to the category of pre-Partition settlers and had reported their mother tongue as Assamese during the Census.

The Nellie massacre and the indiscriminate deportation efforts of the Chaliha government provided both Bengali Hindu and Bengali Muslim minority leaders with the opportunity to campaign in favour of the controversial Illegal Migrants (Determination by Tribunals) (IMDT) Act, 1985. This Act was designed to halt the harassment of the Bengali communities and ensure that proof of citizenship through a judicial process was first ascertained before deportation. For their part, AASU and the Asom Gana Parishad (AGP) saw the IMDT Act as a stumbling block in the detection and deportation of post-1971 illegal Bangaladeshi immigrants and disenfranchisement of immigrants who had entered Assam during 1961-1971 as incorporated in the Assam Accord.

Hindu-Bengali and Muslim migrants saw the Assam Accord signed by the Rajiv Gandhi government and the AASU and the All Asom Gana Sangram Parishad (AAGSP) as anti-minority. In response they formed the United Minorities Front (UMF).

The new party took centre stage in the State’s electoral politics; in 1985 it won 17 seats when the AGP rode to power. The emergence of the UMF gave a new dimension to minority politics as it was the strongest votary of the IMDT Act. In 1990, the Congress, however, managed to woo all 19 UMF legislators to its fold by voicing opposition to the AASU/AGP demand to repeal the Act. This stand of the Congress on the IMDT Act helped it to regain Muslim support, which it retained until the Act was struck down by the Supreme Court.

However, in the wake of the Supreme Court order Muslim leaders turned the table on the Congress and accused the party of not doing enough to win the legal battle. This led to the emergence of the Assam United Democratic Front (AUDF), led by the president of the Assam State Jamiat Ulema-e-Hind, Badaruddin Ajmal, to champion the cause of the minority community. The AUDF wrested 10 Muslim-dominated Assembly seats from the Congress in the 2006 Assembly elections, but that did not stop the Congress from coming back to power for a second term with the support of Bodo legislators.

As the immigrant Muslim settlers continue to devise different strategies to secure their political rights, their socio-economic condition remains poor. For example, the Char areas of lower Assam, which have a large population of legal and illegal immigrants, are characterised by poverty and under-development. Nearly three lakh families out of around 4.35 lakh families residing Char live below the poverty line. The literacy rate in these areas is only 19.3 per cent against the Assamese average of 64 per cent. There are only 52 public health centres to serve a population of 25 lakhs. Soil erosion is a severe problem and has forced a large number of immigrant settlers to move to Guwahati or urban areas of the State in search of employment. Those immigrant settlers who remained have demanded land settlement, but the government is yet to undertake a survey of all the Char areas.

The absence of governance in the Char areas has provided fertile ground for various activities of Islamic fundamentalist groups. A recent conference of police chiefs of northeastern States raised the alarm bell over activities of jehadi groups and the export of Muslim fundamentalism and terrorism in Assam to other States of the region. Assam Director-General of Police D.N. Dutt asserted that the Bangladesh-based jehadi outfit Jamaat-ul Mujahideen had taken over the control of all Islamic fundamentalist groups active in Assam and other northeastern States. He went on to say that the outfit sent jehadis trained in Afghanistan to destabilise the region by striking at soft human targets and vital economic installations. Assam Inspector-General of Police (Special Branch) Khagen Sharma said that altogether 198 men linked with jehadi groups had been arrested in the State and 56 had surrendered to the police since 2001.

Lt Gen R.K. Chabra, General Officer Commander of 4 Corps of the Army, said that Pakistan’s Inter Service Intelligence (ISI) and the Directorate-General of Field Intelligence (DGFI) of Bangladesh had “sleeper agents” in the migrant population of Assam. He said that many who took up instructions from the ISI were in the businesses of gun running, fake currency distribution, and drugs trafficking in the State.

Until the vexed problem of illegal migrants is solved, Assam’s Bengali-speaking Muslim settlers will remain insecure and will not be able to address their socio-economic deprivation.

FORWARD, SLOWLY
By R.Krishnakumar in Thiruvananthapuram

RAMESH KURUP

IN A CENTRAL SCHOOL in Tirur, Malappuram district. The slow but lasting embrace of secular education has transformed social life and leadership roles among Kerala Muslims.

MUSLIMS of Kerala are an odd lot in unequal India. They are separated by geography, history, language and culture from Muslims in other parts of the country. Also, they share a common language but differ from other communities in Kerala in several respects, for example, in “food, dress, manners, mental outlook and philosophy of life”, to quote a popular list.

But what makes them truly different from their brethren elsewhere in the country is their early rejection of traditional Muslim mistrust of and fears about secular education (and, later, communism) and the “dangers” it posed for the faith.

In all regions of what is now Kerala, the south and central parts ruled earlier by the Maharajas of Travancore and Cochin and the north administered by the British as part of the Madras Presidency, government policies had identified “secular education on the Western pattern” as a unifying factor, especially with regard to the integration of `minority’ Muslims (a sizable section of the population) with other communities.

Muslims of Kerala are recorded to have lived in cultural harmony with Hindus in the region for the first eight centuries of their history. But early descriptions of the community at the turn of the 19th century are not in glorious terms but as `backward’, `moribund’, `medieval’, `beaten’, `conservative’ and `defensive’, to name a few.

By the latter part of the 19th century, most of these adjectives became unacceptable following targeted government policies and the slow realisation among newly educated community members about the impractical situation they would be in vis-à-vis other communities (significantly Hindus and Christians) if they continued to nurture their traditional opposition to higher `secular’ education.

Thus, even though elements opposing education other than rote learning of the Koran, education outside madrassas and education of girls remained dominant, and the literacy rate among Muslims remained a mere 5 per cent, there were 1,497 elementary schools for Muslims in British-ruled `Malabar’ by 1931, with a total of 104,000 students (a mere 4 per cent of them were girls), according to researchers. The opportunities for education of Muslims in Travancore and Cochin were much better and came early as a result of the enlightened policies of the rulers and the rumblings of a revolutionary social change already in evidence there by then.

By 1960, nearly three decades after newly educated Muslim leaders began to remark openly that “it was indifference to secular education that was responsible for Muslim inequality with other communities” and that it had “blocked their progress, retarded the community economically, and created a public image and private mentality of backwardness”, an estimated 47.3 per cent of Muslim children of school-going age in Kerala were attending schools along with those from all other communities. And, by 1972, the progressive environment in the State had found almost all eligible Muslim children being admitted in elementary schools.

Scholars have described this as the early “definite turn on a new road” for Muslims in Kerala, the widespread involvement in education producing a remarkable change, “its most important characteristic being the thirst for more”, even though higher education, especially secular college education and education of girls of older age, continued to be a provocative red rag for a large section of community leaders.

In fact, a well-known study on the community by the Canadian Islamic scholar Roland E. Miller says it took nearly a decade after the first Muslim student from the Muslim heartland, Kozhikode district, received a bachelor’s degree in 1939 for a group of progressive Muslims to establish a “Muslim college”, which would be acceptable to (though not all) conservative leaders – with a mosque at the centre of the campus and compulsory religious instruction for all Muslim students – even though its approach was proclaimed to be “cosmopolitan”, and aim was “all-round development of every student” through “liberal education” offering courses in Arabic, Islamic History and Urdu along with English, mathematics, science and commerce and with the faculty being drawn “from the Muslim community whenever possible”.

The Farook College in Kozhikode soon spawned throughout Kerala similar Muslim institutions for education and other progressive social and philanthropic organisations aimed at the social, cultural and educational advancement of Muslims. Its leaders goaded the community “to use their own strength”, “to learn from the example of other communities” “even while maintaining cordial relations with them” and “not to continue blaming their past for their present condition”. Most importantly, it launched a new tradition of challenge within the community to the forces that drew it backwards, compromised its progress for the sake of power, and hindered its development and integration with the secular ethos of the State.

That was not all. Following their slow but lasting embrace of secular education that transformed social life, leadership roles and faith among Kerala Muslims, a cocktail of enticing forces began to beckon, as they had for other communities in Kerala earlier. Among these forces, importantly, were the opportunity that opened before them, following Partition, to participate forcefully in governance in a small State through their own political party and which gave them a sense of power over their destiny; the simultaneous promise that communism brought before them, “of relief from poverty, of social justice, equity, redistribution of land, jobs and higher salaries and living standards”; and later, the seemingly permanent salvation that migration to oil-rich West Asia offered to a lot of them from the pervasive problems of unemployment and insufficient income in modern Kerala.

Of these, the most significant result of early, targeted and secular mass education was the popular realisation among Muslims that the welfare of the community depended on the intelligent utilisation of opportunities for sharing power with others, especially if they could use their vote bank clout as a committed weapon for community advancement. Coalition-ruled Kerala has seen the Muslim League as a ruling partner in many a government. Even though it brought a sense of power and much-needed attention to many of the community’s pressing daily needs, it also gradually led to disenchantment between the League and its usual alliance partner, the Congress, and opened the doors for rival Muslim organisations and the amazing spread of the communist ideology among the Muslim masses.

But as many researchers have pointed out, the solution to the economic disabilities of Muslims of Kerala, some of which they shared historically with their counterparts in North India, “could only be solved partially through politics”. Political power, for example, could help monitor employment policy (not such a novelty in a State where even erstwhile princely states classified Muslims as a “backward community” and introduced communal reservation for them along with others as early as the 1930s) or aid in targeting development activity to areas where a majority of Muslims lived (even unjustly at times at the expense of other regions).

But most of their problems were products of a certain religious inertia and their resultant slow movement from an agrarian, feudal context to a rapidly modernising one, where they found themselves being under-educated, inadequately skilled and ill-equipped for an increasingly competitive job market where the other major communities, Hindus and Christians, already had a lead and were ever moving forward. Moreover, the numerical growth of Muslims in Kerala had continued to be much higher than the growth rate of other communities, adding to their problem of finding education and employment for all.

It is in this context that their early acceptance of communism as a friendly, progressive force becomes the most important and, perhaps, integrating result of secular education among the Muslims of Kerala. Communism appealed to a lot of educated Muslims, as it would brook no discrimination in terms of religion or caste, and especially after it demonstrated a visible commitment to the poor and the minorities (even while it opposed communal parties) by introducing revolutionary land reform and labour laws and welfare policies that offered relief to the poor and the unemployed, irrespective of caste or religion, and by organising successful campaigns for total literacy, decentralisation of State power and on issues of health, population, environment and sanitation.

The response to these State-wide programmes were the most encouraging in north Kerala, especially in Malappuram, which a communist-led State government had carved out in 1969 as a Muslim-majority district and a source of constant political and psychological satisfaction for Kerala’s Muslims. Malappuram was one among the first totally literate districts and recently also became the first totally e-literate district in Kerala. And, throughout the State, as in Malappuram, Muslims are today less wary of the messages on family planning, raising the age of marriage for girls and on the need for utilising the services of health and family planning centres.

Interestingly, Muslims once again felt the need for faster educational progress of their community when the initial rush for jobs and money to the Gulf began to include only well-educated Christian and Hindu engineers, doctors, accountants and managers from Kerala. Later, of course, by the early 1970s when the West Asian oil boom required labourers too in large numbers, even if they were semi-skilled or unskilled, the community benefited and began to catch up, with Gulf remittances boosting family incomes and prospects, including educational opportunities.

No doubt the Gulf boom involved all communities and changed Kerala, launching it into the mode of a high-spending consumer State with low employment potential and fewer avenues for economic growth and welfare or development programmes. As “Gulf mansions” mushroomed and land value went up, a strong middle class arose on the one hand and those who were left out fell further into despair and poverty. There emerged pockets of extreme poverty. At the time of the Gulf war alone did concern arise, especially in the Muslim community, whether the remittances that flowed in, in many cases irrespective of the educational attainments of a large section of job-holders, were indeed put to good use for sustained economic or educational benefit of the community .

The answer, in many cases, was `no’, a worrying one in a State where it was obvious that governments (even those with sizable Muslim representation in it) could no longer be a large-scale job provider, and where, according to a recent study by the Kerala Sastra Sahitya Parishad (KSSP), 15 per cent of the total population are `those below the poverty line’, 35 per cent are `poor’ and 41 per cent belong to the `lower middle class’ and only a thin upper crust of 10 per cent of people consisting of the `immensely rich’ and the `upper middle class’ have benefited from “the rising incomes” reported since the 1990s.

Certainly, Kerala’s evolved political, social and human development context will not allow any sort of discrimination in terms of religion, as any Muslim leader would vouch for today. Such non-discrimination is evident in all walks of life in the State, including in opportunities available for education and government jobs (where Muslims have long enjoyed 12 per cent reservation as one of the eight major backward class communities).

Yet the Rajinder Sachar Committee members who visited the State before finalising their report expressed surprise that a commission (appointed by a communist-led government in 2000) to “study the adequacy or otherwise of representation of the Backward Classes” in public services had found that Muslims (who make up 24.70 per cent of the State’s total population) have got only 10.54 per cent representation in the State departments, the judiciary, public sector enterprises and universities and other autonomous institutions.

The three-member K.K. Narendran Commission found that Muslim representation in public services was in almost all cases below the reservation quota, the difference being between 0.3 per cent and about 6 per cent in the four categories. However, it makes a significant observation about Muslims, after pointing out that Ezhavas, the most socially and educationally advanced among the Backward Classes in the State, have, in contrast, universally got better representation, by securing posts in the merit quota too over and above the reservation quota. The commission said the main reason why Muslims as well as other Backward Class communities have not fared well is “nothing but educational backwardness” and that they can emulate the example of Ezhavas “if they pay more attention to the education of their children”.

Data from the KSSP study published in September 2006 are revealing in this context: of the total Muslim youth in the 18 to 25 age group in Kerala, a mere 8.1 per cent are in college (Hindus: 18.7 per cent; Christians: 20.5 per cent), 6.2 per cent alone are engaged in other studies (Hindus: 9.9; Christians 14.9); 30.5 per cent are employed (Hindus: 32.3; Christians 32.7) and 55.2 per cent are unemployed (Hindus: 39.1 per cent; Christians 31.9 per cent).

Muslims have clicked `Pause’ on education only to their disadvantage even in a progressive society that has nurtured their interests throughout history.

The Principle-Centered Leadership

Ten Tools for Increasing Your Principle-Centered Power

Principle-centered or legitimate power is based on trust, respect and honor, not fear or coercion. Here are ten tools you can use to increase your honor, and therefore your power, as a leader:

Persuasion . The ability to argue strongly and convincingly about your position while maintaining genuine respect for your followers’ opinions.
Patience. Exercising patience over your followers’ shortcomings, and with the achievement of goals.
Gentleness. Towards the feelings and vulnerabilities of your followers.
Teachableness . Being open to learning new things from your followers.
Acceptance. Accepting instead of judging your followers’ mistakes or imperfections.
Kindness. Being sensitive, caring and thoughtful.
Openness. Being open to possibilities.
Compassionate Confrontation. Making corrections with warmth and concern.
Consistency. Sticking to a personal code based on a solid set of values and principles and always acting based on this.
Integrity. Acting only for the good of others, without a desire to take advantage of them.

Trustworthy, and therefore effective, people usually exhibit the following personal characteristics:

They are continuously learning. They read, watch, observe and learn all the time; they are constantly trying to acquire new knowledge and skills.
They are service-oriented. A genuine sense of responsibility toward others is a natural manifestation of being principle-centered.
They radiate positive energy. Principle-centered people are happy and optimistic; they tend to dissipate negative energy and maintain a positive outlook.
They believe in other people. They believe in the unseen potential of other; they don’t prejudge.
They lead balanced lives. They lead well-rounded lives; they are able to establish a fulfilling career and pursue personal interests while maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships with others.
They see life as an adventure. They are not afraid to bust out of their comfort zones in order to try something new, to experience something they have never experienced before; they lead unpredictable, exciting lives.
They are synergistic . They are highly creative; they can come up with synergistic solutions to problems.
They exercise for self-renewal. They develop themselves physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

Ten rules for Being HUMAN

These are the rules, If life is a game .. By Chene alter scott.

1.Take care of your BODY, make peace and accept and honour it
2.Listen and learn from the lessons given as gift /guide by life
3.There are not mistakes only lessons- Grow, Learn to forgive, Be compassionate, ethical and humorous
4.Lessons are regularly repeated until you learn properly, and everything that comes to you is because you project it into the world
5.Learning is never ending. learn to surrender, commit, be humble and be adaptable
6.There is no better than here and now. Avoid longing. Be thankful
7.Everyone and everything is a reflection of yourself. You cannot love or have another with doing the same to you. Shift perspective
9.It is up to you to make up your life. You will only have tools and resources and no help or ready-made guide. Stitch in time saves nine
9.All answers to all your problems is readily available inside you. Look listen and learn to trust your conscience
10.Your will forget all of this at birth and have to relearn and unlearn. Keep in touch with people who remember this truth and help you recall.

Your Road Map for Success , How You CAN Get There From Here By John C. Maxwell

Your Road Map for Success , How You CAN Get There From Here By John C. Maxwell
Everyone has his own specific vocation… that demands fulfilment. Everyone’s task is as unique as his specific opportunity to implement it.
3 Questions ….Identify your purpose by asking:
For what am I searching?
Why was I created?
Do I believe in my potential?”
3 Dreams.
A dream without a positive attitude produces a daydreamer.
A positive attitude without a dream produces a pleasant person who can’t progress.
A dream together with a positive attitude produces a person with unlimited possibilities and potential.
4 steps towards growing out toward your potential:
Concentrate on one main goal.
Concentrate on continual improvement.
Forget the past.
Focus on the future.
4 types of people who trod this earth
The Victim: The victim blames his past for his lack of progress, finding excuses for failing rather than using his opportunities to grow.
The Foot dragger: The foot dragger hates change and is unwilling to do anything to change the present.
The Dreamer: This traveller never puts her plans into action and does not want to take any risks.
The Motivated: This traveller planned yesterday so that she could make the
5 Points to remember
1. Believe in your ability to succeed.
2. Get rid of your pride.
3. Cultivate constructive discontent.
4. Escape from habit.
5. Balance creativity with character.
6 Problem–solving strategies:
Attack the problem, never the person.
Get all the facts. Before you attack the problem, make sure you know what is really going on.
List all your options.
Choose the best solution. Always remember that people are your priority.
Look for the positives in the problem.
Never withhold love. Acknowledge problems but continue to love your family members unconditionally.
6 Qualities Your Goal must have: SMARTW
Specific and stretchable
Measurable and motivating
Achievable and commercially attainable
Time-sensitive and technically feasible
Realistic and reasonable
Written and worldly
7 Signs of Attitude being great
Believe in yourself.
Willingness to see the best in others.
Ability to see opportunity everywhere.
Focus on Solutions.
Desire to Give.
Persistence.
Responsibility for their lives.
10 principles that can help you in your personal growth: 
Choose a life of growth.
Start growing today.
Be Teachable
Focus on Self-Development, not self-fulfilment.
Never stay satisfied with current accomplishments.
Be a Continual Learner.
Concentrate on a Few Major Themes.
Develop a Plan for Growth.
Pay the Price.
Find a way to apply what you learn
10 guidelines to help you change failure from detour to dividend:
Appreciate the value of failure
Don’t take failure personally.
Let failure redirect you.
Keep a sense of humour.
Ask why, not who.
Make failure a learning experience.
Don’t let failure keep you down.
Use failure as a gauge of growth.
See the Big Picture.
Don’t give up.
10 qualities of a potential leader 
Make things happen.
See and seize opportunities.
Influence others.
Add Value.
Attract other leaders.
Equip others.
Provide inspiring ideas.
Possess uncommonly positive attitudes.
Live up to their commitments.
Have loyalty.

Focus for success in Life

Too often we forget OUR LIFE is not a dress rehearsal. This is the real thing and we can and should step up to the Challenge everyday.

The key “Focusing Strategies” that have the potential to lead one to success. are as follows:
1.Habits
2.Focus
3.Goals (seeing the Big Picture)
4.Balance 5.Relationships
6.Confidence
7.Asking for What You Want
8.Persistence
9.Decisive Action
10.Purpose

1.To laugh often and much;
2.To win the respect of intelligent people
3.And affection of children; to earn the
4.Appreciation of honest critics and endure
5.The betrayal of false friends;
6.To appreciate beauty, to find the best in others;
7.To leave the world a bit better, whether by a
8.Healthy child, a garden patch or a
9.Redeemed social condition; to know even
10.One life has breathed easier because you
11.Have lived. This is to have succeeded
Ralph Waldo Emerson

From
The Power of Focus By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, and Les Hewitt

Quick Tips to Improve Your Position in Life , Make these ‘wise moves’ in LIFE by George Ludwig

1. One Is a Powerful Number. Even ONE person can achieve great things
2. Any Day Can Be Halloween. Celebrate life every moment
3. Discipline: The Critical Denominator Be Punctual so that the goodies come to you in time
4. Fly Straight to Your Destination- by commitment perserverance and determination
5. Get the Hunger PANG .Have thirst and hunger for Success and happiness. U will find it.
6. He Who Laughs, Lasts! Humour and taking things lightly extends your lifespan
7. The Key to Genius is Out of Box thingking. Be creative . Think laterally.
8. Take the First Step. Break Fear psychosisby simply having enough faith to start first step.
9. Peak Performers Focus on Winning , by correcting mistakes and learning from experience
10.The Rapid Results,come from change in posture, breathing, muscle tension, and tonality.
11.Being honest keeps open the door of trust that is necessary to have healthy relationships
12.Have Action plan, right Attitude, extra-high Activity level, and some outstanding Coaching
13. Go Back to School, but Don’t Forget Your Brain. Wisdom is different from knowledge
14.We are all designed to need frequent refueling of our emotional tanks by family and friends
15.there is always a price we must pay, and mostly that price needs to be paid up front
16. Get in Flow ie life is easy when one faces a clear goal requiring predictable responses
17.True leaders demonstrate integrity by example
18.While actions often speak louder than words, words still have the power to change, improve and even save lives
19. You are Never too Old… to be Bold!
20.No person is inwardly peaceful who does not carve out a little time daily for spiritual practice

Make a Life, Not Just a Living By Dr. Ron Jenson By Broadman & Holman Publishers

Make a Life, Not Just a Living By Dr. Ron Jenson By Broadman & Holman Publishers

Timeless Life Skills That Couldl Maximize Your Real Worth

MAKE THINGS HAPPEN
be a difference-maker, a maximizer, be assertive and proactive in your thoughts and actions

A CIVILIZATION OF VICTIMS
don’t become a civilization of blamers and “victims.” don’t blame our past, our parents, our society, our heritage, our “dysfunctionalities,” , or anything else we can think of for our existing personal problems.

BE PROACTVIE, NOT REACTIVE
Proactive is -pro, meaning “for,” and active, meaning “doing something.” ,we have no control harmful,often resulting in worry,fear and manipulation and you need to have right attitude, right beliefs, and right commitments Reactive people focus on the result. Proactive people focus on the principles.

BE DISCIPLINED, NOT LAZY
Self-discipline is “the ability to regulate conduct by principle and judgement rather than impulse, desire, high-pressure, or social custom.,consciously control your circumstances. ”

ACTION STEPS
How do you view yourself – as victim or victor? What areas of your life are most disciplined? Identify one area in which you can improve..! What habits are holding you back from authentic success?

YOU ARE SIGNIFICANT
Do not waste of human resources. Are the instruments of your life – your talents, skills, and abilities, relationships, the resources you’ve been given – starting to blend into beautiful music, or are they silent?

THE ARCHITECTURE OF A BRAND
Deal with our weaknesses Denying your weaknesses look for opportunities to grow, and you keep adjusting

MAXIMIZER’S CREED
I will take charge of my life and make a difference
I will live my life with a sense of dignity
I will embrace problems as positive opportunities
I will centre my life on universal principles
I will passionately pursue my mission
I will keep all areas of my life in balance
I will put others first and honestly serve them
I will cultivate my character and spirit
I will keep adjusting to needs
I will never, ever, quit

ACCEPT PROBLEMS
Life is either hard and satisfying or easy and unsatisfying. What you make in life depends on the challenges you choose to accept or seek. We tend to dodge our emotions, avoiding the difficulties and substituting anything else that will keep us from our true feelings. You and I were created for joy, and if we miss it, we miss the reason for our existence; Joy’s integrity is compatible with pain wherein only the heart that hurts has a right to joy Be Willing to Take Risks i.e. willing to fail, learn to live on the edge, willing to accept difficulties with maturity, should see risk taking as an opportunity to, be stretched and to grow

BELIEVE THE BEST
As we think, so we act., control your thought patterns by believing :

ACTION STEPS
What is the major problem in your life right now? How are you handling it? Choose joy. Write down how you will respond as you embrace the above problem Choose a person in your life to whom you can be accountable to practice the requisite changes

VERIFY YOUR OWN VALUES
Determine what value is directing your life. Distinguish between principles and values. Decide A value that which is your perception of where you’re going in life. Declare that Your principles are absolutely true in every circumstance. Detour as Your values may change as your understanding of absolutes increases

LEARN THE RIGHT PERSPECTIVE ON ISSUES
Look for the truth. always Demonstrate what is right and wrong, about the ethical and unethical, about the moral, amoral, and immoral. Accept natural law principles that govern the universe and how people should live. Is it legal? Is it balanced? How will it make me feel about myself? Is it right?

TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THE BRAND EXPERIENCE
Did I schedule my principles and philosophy into my daily planner? Did I keep my schedule as I planned? How did I spend my idle time? Where did I spend my money? What did I daydream or dwell upon? Did my values inside match my values outside?

PRINCIPLE DEVELOPMENT
What are the principles with which you want to form the map for your life? Begin to build them into your life as your code of conduct

THE POWER OF A MISSION
Vision of A sense of a mission gives meaning and significant Value to our lives to endure all the problems

HOW DID WE GET OUT OF BALANCE?
Picking out one little thing and trying to know more about it became the most predictable path to newly revalued prizes of prominence and prosperity.

RESULTS OF IMBALANCE
Burnout is “a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal achievements that occurs among individuals who do people work of some kind.”

BALANCE PRIORITIES
Rule your Impulses, The starting point for balancing your priorities is to take charge of your internal drives. Be disciplined., Reorder your priorities, Place your priorities in the proper order. Readjust your schedule, Determine your schedule., Look at your schedule and keep changing it to reflect your reordered priorities.

TEAMWORK
“Zeroing in on Caring for People” is the key to developing intimate relationships and to changing people’s lives How we change others will be in direct proportion to the level of love we put into our relationship with them. Unabashed caring is the essence of “team-ness,” which is fundamental for powerful families, friendships, communities, and entire cultures.

UPLIFT ONE ANOTHER
There are two Greek words, para and kaleo, Para means “alongside” and kaleo means “to call.” It means helping to change another’s attitude so he or she is willing to go back into battle.

NEED ONE ANOTHER
To develop a healthy interdependence through needing one another. Needing people, and not being ashamed to admit it, is very necessary to get ahead.

TRUST ONE ANOTHER
This principle is simply about “believing the best” about people. Trust underscores the need not to develop harmful imaginations about others. Forming preliminary assumptions

WHY IS ENERGIZING OUR INNER LIFE SO CRITICAL?..
Character-centered-ness.. It’s the Source of Our Strength It’s the Basis for Enduring Societies It’s the Secret to our Satisfaction

WHAT DOES FAITH OFFER?
Why do researchers find such positive links among faith, mental health and happiness? Community Commitment Contentment

CONCENTRATE ON BEING
why are we not learning to live from the inside out. We are a culture and society now of people consumed by “having.” Ownership seems to be the king of virtues, no matter what the commodity, and yet we are a society of notoriously unhappy people – lonely, anxious, depressed and dependent

CULTIVATE SPIRITUALITY
It is about our relationship with others including God and we need to develop a way to get into our inner selves, which praying can provide. , meditate on great and time-tested principles, develop a method of expressing our inner system of beliefs, which is roughly what we may call faith.

FRAMING
Framing is developing your overall perspective and sense of parameters about any issues in life. Whenever you face a decision, you need to begin by forming your framework. What’s your frame? What are your guides? What will give stability to any decision you make? It entails four major aspects, which become clearer if you can picture the four sides of a picture frame: your overarching purpose in this situation and in your life, your priorities in this situation and in your life, your principles and guidelines in this situation and in your life, and finally, your peculiarities.

FOCUS
Its ability to keep your eye on your goal and the task at hand, while at the same time being mentally agile in dealing with the various contingencies that come into play. , remain directed and not be interrupted while being aware of your environment.

FLEXING
Flexibility, or mental agility, is the [ability] to change perspective and do the creative thinking necessary to deal with challenges.

FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT- Kurukshetra of Thoughts
Life is not meant to be a playground where personal ease and satisfaction are the goals and expected results. The real war is for the good of people’s hearts and minds. Forces around us that constantly push us away from what you call “rightness living” and woo us toward narcissistic self-destruction.

BE FAITHFUL TO THE PRINCIPLES
Faithfulness is one of the least revered and most needed qualities in our culture today. To be faithful is to “adhere strictly to the person, cause, or idea to which one is bound; be dutiful and loyal.”

FINISH THE COURSE
he primary skill to develop is perseverance. To persevere is to “persist in or remain constant to a purpose, idea or task in the face of obstacles or discouragement.” Regardless of the circumstance, never ever give up.

FOCUS ON THE FUTURE
Life is about concentrating on the roots and letting the fruit come as a result. Concentrate on building these root principles in your life, keep in mind the future implications of each decision you make.

Survival Is Not Enough,By Seth Godin ,Simon & Schuster, Inc. 2002

Zooming, Evolution, and the Future of Your Company

Change is the new normal.
Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution can be applied as a metaphor for businesses.
Only companies that zoom, or learn to adapt and evolve constantly will survive.
Companies that don’t evolve and make change a normal thing are signing up for their own extinction.
Genes take longer to change over time. Memes, or new ideas, spread at a much faster rate than genes.
Zooming is about constant change, for no particular reason, and with no particular goal.
Zooming is less painful. You gradually breed a new kind of species, instead of forcing one to make a big traumatic change.
Zooming is about stretching your limits by adapting to new ideas, opportunities, and challenges without triggering our inherent human change-avoidance reflex.
Zooming is about adapting small changes over time.
You can practice zooming in everyday life: change your office layout, eat in a different restaurant every weekend, listening to a new CD everyday, read a magazine you’ve never read before, or just do something for the first time, as often as possible.
Normal can be an environment where new memes appear on a regular basis.
Companies that zoom do the same thing but try something just a little bit differently each time.

By Seth Godin ,Simon & Schuster, Inc. 2002

Becoming a Person of Influence

How to Positively Impact the Lives of Others

The power to positively change your life and the lives of others depends on the degree of your influence. For John Maxwell, leadership IS influence. Jim Dornan agrees. Without influence, success is impossible. Famous people like Madonna, John Grisham, Mother Teresa, Bill Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Pablo Picasso and even Adolf Hitler are excellent examples of people with influence.

However, one need not be famous or be in a high-profile position to be a person of influence. Each person, whether he intends it or not, is an influencer. Parents wield influence over their children. Spouses influence each other. Teachers affect the futures of their students. Pastors impact their flocks’ lives. Friends and colleagues you interact with shape your opinions. You influence peers, superiors, and subordinates. As long as you relate with somebody, you are an influencer.

Becoming a person of influence is not an instantaneous process. It takes time, effort, and the practice of certain behaviors. The authors define influence using the following keywords:

Learning these qualities might help in this attepmt.
Integrity,Nurture,Faith,Listen,Understand,Enlarge,Navigate,Connect,Empower,Reproduce,

20 steps to spirituality

1 Do charity regularly, every month, or even daily according to your means, say atleast six paisa per rupee earned
2 Do not depend upon servants. do not engage others for menial service but Provide them gainful employment .Self-reliance is the highest of all virtues
3 Fast on Ekadasi, or once a fortnight live Only on liquid food or just fruits
4 Get by heart some prayer-Slokas, Stotras and repeat them as soon as you sit in the Asana before starting Japa or meditation.
5 Have Japa Mala (rosary), and keep repeating hotly names, NAMA Sangirtan,
6 Have Satsanga.Avoid any evil /helpless habits.Give up bad / unproductive company,
7 Never hurt anybody (Ahimsa Paramo Dharmah). Control anger by love, Kshama (forgiveness) and Daya (compassion).
8 Observe Mouna Vrata (vow of silence) for a couple of hours daily.
9 Practaice Fourfold sadhana: discrimination, dispassion, sixfold virtues and desire for Liberation.
10 Preserve Veerya , It is God in motion or manifestation—Vibhuti. It is the essence of life, thought and intelligence
11 Reduce your wants. Meet only your basic needs.Avoid unnecessary worry. Have simple living and high thinking.Be content. Be not Greedy or selfish.
12 Remember that death is awaiting you at every moment. Never fail to fulfil your duties. Have pure conduct (Sadachara).Do not run after Desires
13 Repeat any Mantra as pure Om or Om Namo Narayanaya, Om Namah Sivaya, according to your taste or inclination, say from 108 to 21,600 times daily.
14 Sit on Padma, Siddha or Sukha Asana for Japa and meditation for half an hour, facing the east or the north. Do Sirshasana and Sarvangasana Pranayamas.etc., regularly.
15 Speak the truth at all cost. Speak a little. Speak sweetly.
16 Study systematically the Gita,Upanishads or Bible, Zend Avesta, the Koran, one hour daily and have Suddha Vichara.
17 Take Sattvic food, Suddha Ahara Give up those things which the mind likes best for a fortnight in a year. Give up salt and sugar for a month.
18 Think of CREATOR and Thank as soon as you wake up and just before you go to sleep. Surrender yourself completely to God (Saranagati).
19 Think of the mistakes you have committed during the course of the day, just before retiring to bed (self-analysis, and work on corrective action Dont brood
20 Wake up and Get up at Brahmamuhurta which is extremely favourable for meditation every day

Who Moved My Cheese – Dr. Spencer Johnson 2000 Vermilion UK, Random House Group Ltd.

Wisdom in a Nutshell from Who Moved My Cheese?
• Anticipate change.
• Adapt quickly.
• Enjoy change.
• Be ready to change quickly, again and again.
• Having Cheese makes you happy.
• The more important your Cheese is to you, the more you want to hold on to it.
• If you do not change, you can become extinct.
• Ask yourself “What would I do if I weren’t afraid?”
• Smell the Cheese often so you know when it is getting old.
• Movement in a new direction helps you find New Cheese.
• When you move beyond your fear, you feel free.
• Imagining myself enjoying New Cheese, even before I find it, leads me to it.
• The quicker you let go of old cheese, the sooner you find New Cheese.
• It is safer to search in the maze than remain in a cheeseless situation.
• Old beliefs do not lead you to New Cheese.
• When you see that you can find and enjoy New Cheese, you change course.
• Noticing small changes early helps you adapt to the bigger changes that are to come.
• Read the Handwriting on the Wall
• Change happens. They keep moving the Cheese.
• Move with the Cheese and enjoy it!

“Leaders” by Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus. Published by Harper and Row in 1986, 244 pages. ISBN 0-06-091336-3.

1.Leadership is the pivotal force behind successful organisations and that to create vital and viable organisations, leadership is necessary to help organisations develop a new vision of what they can be, then mobilize the organisation change toward the new vision”.
2.There really is a commitment gap. Leaders have failed to instil vision, meaning and trust in their followers. They have failed to empower
3.Credibility is at a premium these days. Leaders are being scrutinised as never before. Fifty years ago this was not the case
4.Historically leaders have controlled rather than organised, administered repression rather than expression, and held their followers in arrestment rather than in evolution”.
5.As we see it, effective leadership can move organisations from current to future states, create visions of potential opportunities for organisations, instil within employees commitment to change and instil new cultures and strategies in organisations that mobilize and focus energy and resources.
6.They emerge when organisations face new problems and complexities that cannot be solved by unguided evolution. They assume responsibilities for reshaping organisational practices to adapt to environmental changes. They direct organisational changes that build confidence and empower their employees to seek new ways of doing things. They overcome resistance to change by creating visions of the future that evoke confidence in, and mastery of new organisational practices.Vision is the commodity of leaders, and power is their currency
7.Leadership is like the abominable snowman, whose footprints are everywhere but who is nowhere to be seen
8.The problem with many organisations, is that they tend to be overmanaged and underled. They may excel in the ability to handle the daily routine, yet never question whether the routine should be done at all
9.Most leaders embodied these competencies/ human handling skills
10.Strategy 1: Attention through vision., Strategy 2: Meaning through communication. , Strategy 3: Trust through positioning., Strategy 4: The deployment of self through (1) positive self regard, and (2) the ‘Wallenda factor'” – named after Karl Wallenda, the tight-rope walker who would (could?) not consider the possibility of failure.
11.Leadership seems to be the marshalling of skills possessed by a majority but used by a minority.
12.Management of attention through vision is the creating of focus. with an unparalleled concern with outcome.
13.Their visions or intentions are compelling, and pull people towards them. Intensity coupled with commitment is magnetic. These intense personalities do not have to coerce people to pay attention, they are so intent on what they are doing that, like a child absorbed with creating a sand castle in a sandbox, they draw others in”.
14.Leadership is also a transaction between leaders and followers. Neither could exist without the other.
15.Leaders articulate and define what has previously remained implicit or unsaid. They communicate in toto
16.Good ideas are not adopted automatically. They must be driven into practice with courageous patience
17.In order for an organisation to have integrity, it must have an identity – that is, a sense of who it is and what it is to do and also Why and When
18.Positive self regard. which consists of three major components: knowledge of one’s strengths, the capacity to nurture and develop those strengths, and the ability to discern the fit between one’s strengths and weaknesses and the organisation’s needs is a basic requirement for success
19.Our leaders seemed to retain characteristics like : enthusiasm for people; spontaneity; imagination, and an unlimited capacity to learn new behaviour”.
20.Leaders “simply don’t think about failure, don’t even use the word. For the successful leader, failure is a beginning, the springboard to hope
21.Criticism is a frequent by-product of significant actions. Receptivity to criticism is as necessary as it is loathsome. And, the more valid the criticism, the more difficult it is to receive”.
22.The essential thing in organisational leadership is that the leader’s style pulls rather than pushes people on
23.When they took charge of their organisation – leaders paid attention to what was going on; they determined what part of the events at hand would be important for the future of the organisation; they set a new direction, and they concentrated the attention of everyone in the organisation on it
24.The critical point is that a vision articulates a view of a realistic, credible, attractive future for the organisation, a condition that is better in some important ways than what now exists
25.With a vision, the leader provides the all-important bridge from the present to the future of the organisation, along with the mission and values or whatever
26.The manager by contrast, operates on the physical resources of the organisation, on its capital, human skills, raw materials, and technology”.
27.Great leaders often inspire their followers to high levels of achievement by showing them how their work contributes to worthwhile ends.
28.The leader must be a superb listener, particularly to those advocating new or different images of the emerging reality…they are great askers and they do pay attention
29.Vision of future success… are cretaed basically from three sources from which to seek guidance – the past, the present, and alternative images of future possibilities
30.Fail to honour people, they fail to honour you. But the sign of a good leader, who talks little, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say, ‘this we did for ourselves
31.Trust is the emotional glue that binds followers and leaders together. The accumulation of trust is a measure of the legitimacy of leadership. It cannot be mandated or purchased; it must be earned
32.Strategies that leaders choose to position are .. /1. Reactive. With this approach, the organisation waits for the change and reacts – after the fact./ 2. Change the internal environment. Rather than waiting for change to happen to them, leaders can develop effective forecasting procedures to anticipate change and then ‘proact’ rather than react. / 3. Change the external environment. This approach requires that the organisation anticipating change upon the environment itself to make the change congenial to its needs. /4. Establish a new linkage between the external and internal environments. Using this mechanism, an organisation anticipating change will attempt to establish a new relationship between its internal environments and anticipated external environments.
33.Qualities needed to run an institution are only persistence and self-knowledge; willingness to take risks and accept losses; commitment, consistency, and challenge. But, above all, learning, continuously from reading and experience of oneself and others.
34.Very simply, those who do not learn do not long survive as leaders. Leaders have discovered not just how to learn but how to learn in an organisational context. Distinguish maintenance learning, at which many managers excel, as it is synonymous with stability and normality, and innovative learning which leaders need to move and develop their organisations beyond current, into future positions.
35.A learning organisation places a high value on these experiences because they supply a reality test and permit adjustments without which larger mistakes might be made in the future”.

The above summary has been provided to you compliments of Andrew Gibbons

Emotional wisdom

Emotional wisdom, reflects itself in the way people relate to others. In the case of our ninety leaders, they used five key skills:
1. The ability to accept people as they are, not as you would like them to be.
2. The capacity to approach relationships and problems in terms of present rather than the past.
3. The ability to treat those who are close to you with the same courteous attention that you extend to strangers and casual acquaintances.
4. The ability to trust others, even if the risk seems great.
5. The ability to do without constant approval and recognition from others.

The Leader’s Seven Essential Behaviors

The Discipline of Getting Things Done By Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan

Know Your People and Your Business.
Insist on Realism.
Set Clear Goals and Priorities.
Follow Through.
Reward the Doers.
Expand People’s Capabilities through Coaching.
Know Yourself.

Set the targets: Keep your targets realistic. Base them on track records and histories.
Develop action and contingency plans: Study the possible outcomes that might leave the company most vulnerable and base your contingency plan on that. In other words, plan for the worst.
Get agreement and closure from all participants: Communicate agreed-upon goals to the people concerned after the meeting, to reiterate your expectations and what they promised to deliver

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff at Work Richard Carlson, Ph.D.Hyperion, 1999

1. Dare to Be Happy.
2. Become Less Controlling.
3. Eliminate the Rat Race Mentality.
4. Don’t Dramatize the Deadlines.
6. Avoid Corporate Bragging.
7. Make the Best of Those Boring Meetings.
8. Stop Anticipating Tiredness.
9. Don’t Sweat the Bureaucracy.
10. Remember the Phrase, “Being Dead Is Bad for Business.”
11. Make the Best of Corporate Travel.
12. Light a Candle Instead of Cursing the Darkness.
13. Join My New Club, “TGIT”
14. Don’t Sweat the Demanding Boss.
15. Remember to Acknowledge.
16. Don’t Keep People Waiting.
17. Create a Bridge Between Your Spirituality and Your Work.
18. Brighten Up Your Working Environment.
19. Take Your Breaks.
20. Don’t Take the 20/80 Rule Personally.
21. Make a List of Your Personal Priorities.
22. Use Effective Listening as a Stress-Reducing Tool.
23. Make Friends with Your Receptionist.
24. Remember the Motto, “You Catch More Flies with Honey.”
25. Avoid the Phrase, “I Have to Go to Work.”
26. Be Aware of the Potentially Stressful Effects of Your Promises.
27. Examine Your Rituals and Habits (and Be Willing to Change Some of Them).
28. Stay Focused in the Now.
29. Be Careful What You Ask For.
30. Absorb the Speed Bumps of Your Day.
31. Have a Favorite Business Charity.
32. Never, Ever Backstab.
33. Accept the Fact That, Every Once in a While, You’re Going to Have a Really Bad Day.
34. Recognize Patterns of Behavior.
35. Lower Your Expectations.
36. Pat Yourself on the Back.
37. Become Less Self-Absorbed.
38. Don’t Be Trapped by Golden Handcuffs.
39. Get Really Comfortable Using Voice Mail.
40. Stop Wishing You Were Somewhere Else.
41. Ask Yourself the Question, “Am I Making the Absolute Best of This Moment?”
42. Stop Scrambling.
43. Become Aware of Your Wisdom.
44. Realize the Power of Rapport.
45. Recover Quickly.
46. Encourage Company Stress-Busters.
47. Give Up Your Fear of Speaking to Groups.
48. Avoid Comments that Are Likely to Lead to Gossip or Unwanted Chatter.
49. See Beyond the Roles.
50. Avoid the Tendency to Put a Cost on Personal Things.
51. When You Solicit Advice, Consider Taking It.
52. Take Advantage of Your Commute.
53. Let Go of Battles that Cannot Be Won.
54. Think of Stress and Frustration as Distractions to Your Success.
55. Accept the Fact that There’s Almost Always Going to Be Someone Mad at You.
56. Don’t Let Your Own Thoughts Stress You Out.
57. Make Allowances for Incompetence.
58. Don’t Be Too Quick to Comment.
59. Let Go of “Personality Clashes.”
60. Don’t Get Stressed by the Predictable.
61. Stop Procrastinating.
62. Confront Gently.
63. Remember the Three R’s.
64. Get Out of the Grumble Mode.
65. Get It Over With.
66. Don’t live in an Imagined Future.
67. Make Someone Else Feel Good.
68. Compete from the Heart.
69. Back Off When You Don’t Know What to Do.
70. Admit that It’s Your Choice.
71. Before Becoming Defensive, Take Note of What Is Being Said.
72. Complete As Many Tasks as Possible.
73. Spend Ten Minutes a Day Doing Absolutely Nothing.
74. Learn to Delegate.
75. Strengthen Your Presence.
76. Learn to Say No without Guilt.
77. Take Your Next Vacation at Home.
78. Don’t Let Negative Coworkers Get You Down.
79. Make the Best of a “Noncreative” Position.
80. Stay Close to Your Center.
81. Forgive Yourself, You’re Human.
82. Put Your Mind in Neutral.
83. Marvel at How Often Things Go Right.
84. Make Peace with Chaos.
85. Prevent Burnout.
86. Experience a Magical Transformation.
87. Avoid “If Only, Then” Thinking.
88. Eliminate the Worry Factor.
89. Ask for What You Want, But Don’t Insist on Getting It.
90. Remember the Whole Story.
91. Tap into Your Secret Stress-Buster.
92. Speak to Others with Love and Respect.
93. Don’t Go There.
94. Remember to Appreciate the People You Work With.
95. Don’t Sweat Your Critics.
96. Reduce Your Self-Induced Stress.
97. Become Aware of the Thought Factor.
98. Ease Off Your Ego.
99. Remember, Small Stuff Happens.
100. Don’t Live for Retirement.

The One Minute Manager : Kenneth Blanchard, Spencer Johnson

Despite its age, the method is simple -you can read it in half an hour- yet extremely powerful. First, define the behaviors or results you want. then let your reports go out and perform. During the performance, you offer reinforcement in two forms, positive or negative. Catch someone doing good, you give them a One Minute Praising ,Catch a report doing something bad, you give them a One Minute Reprimand . They are simple and very effective. Once you know where you want people to go, the behavior shaping methods presented in this book will likely get your team there, and quickly

It’s all about your team /Mr K. Nanda Kumar, President & CEO, SunTec

It’s all about your team Mr K. Nanda Kumar, President & CEO, SunTec
The fish rots from the head’. This best describes how important leadership is.

A leader at every step exudes positive energy. A true leader has this magnificent obsession about creating a compelling future.
A leader imbibes in his team the vision of an organisation, he will make the team dream this vision, live it, breathe it, feel it in their blood, and finally achieve it.

Leadership should be by consent, not by command. A leader, who wishes to drive his team, big or small, forward, should volunteer to get behind the wheels first. Back-seat driving is dangerous, and the corporate world is no exception.
A successful leader understands that people come first. He needs to let his team win and not hog the limelight. He is mature enough to understand that when his team wins, he wins.

Evolutionary leaders create and sustain an intention in the design and development of the enterprise. Such leaders are not born; they are made.
The supreme quality for leadership is integrity, impeccable code of conduct and selfless service to the team. Be it a Lombardi or Belichick in football field or Gandhiji or Churchill in politics, all lived by their people.

A leader changes before he has to! A true leader not just accepts change but drives and manages it in his team once he is convinced about its purpose. A leader is a facilitator, a manager, a guide and a mentor, all rolled into one.
Creating, communicating and completing (executing) a business strategy in pursuit of an organisation’s vision are at the core of leadership.

Establishing a strategic direction, with the ability to get people onboard, ensuring the strategy is followed, making course corrections if needed, and ensuring integration among business units are vital leadership traits.
There is no easy recipe for being a leader. If only I had one! But at the core of leadership I believe is a passion for people, a passion to see your team win the right way.